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  • seagrass
  • West Nile virus
  • prime numbers
Your search has returned 2130 articles:
  • News

    Pollution regulations help Chesapeake Bay seagrass rebound

    Underwater grasses are growing back in the Chesapeake Bay. The plants now carpet three times as much real estate as in 1984, thanks to more than 30 years of efforts to reduce nitrogen pollution. This environmental success story shows that regulations put in place to protect the bay’s health have made a difference, researchers report the week of March 5 in Proceedings of the National Academy of...

    03/05/2018 - 15:00 Ecosystems, Oceans, Plants
  • News

    Zika may not be the only virus of its kind that can damage a fetus

    Zika virus may not be the black sheep of the family. Infections with either of two related viruses also cause fetal defects in mice, researchers find.

    Some scientists have speculated that Zika’s capacity to harm a fetus might be unique among its kind, perhaps due to a recent change in the virus’s genetic material (SN: 10/28/17, p. 9). Others have argued that perhaps this dangerous...

    01/31/2018 - 14:21 Biomedicine, Health
  • Science Ticker

    The largest known prime number has 23 million-plus digits

    There’s a new largest known prime number in town, with a whopping 23,249,425 digits. The figure is calculated by multiplying 2 by itself 77,232,917 times and then subtracting 1. Announced on January 3, the number is almost a million digits longer than the last record-breaking prime.

    A prime number can’t be divided by anything other than 1 and itself. If you started counting at 1, you’d...

    01/05/2018 - 07:00 Numbers
  • Science Visualized

    How freezing a soap bubble turns it into a ‘snow globe’

    View the video

    Frigid air can transform an ordinary soap bubble into a glittery “snow globe.” No shaking required.

    When a bubble is placed in a freezer set to –20° Celsius, delicate ice crystals swirl gracefully across the soapy film, gradually growing larger until the bubble freezes solid. The phenomenon can also be observed when blowing soap bubbles outside in wintry weather....

    12/05/2017 - 15:00 Physics, Materials
  • News

    Skeletons could provide clues to who wrote or protected the Dead Sea Scrolls

    BOSTON — A decades-long debate over who once occupied a settlement located near the caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found has taken a chaste turn.

    Analyses of 33 newly excavated skeletons of people buried at the West Bank site, Qumran, supports a view that the community consisted of a religious sect of celibate men. Anthropologist Yossi Nagar of the Israel Antiquities Authority in...

    11/17/2017 - 14:05 Archaeology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers inspired by SN 10 scientists’ research

    Wanting more

    For the third year in a row, Science News profiled 10 early- and mid-career i­nnovators who are transforming their fields in “The SN 10: Scientists to watch” (SN: 10/14/17, p. 16).

    The profiles left some readers inspired, intrigued and wanting to know more about these scientists’ research.

    “Really enjoying these portraits, thanks, SN!” online reader Maia commented...

    11/15/2017 - 13:17 Science & Society, Robotics, Psychology
  • News in Brief

    A deadly 2014 landslide’s power came from soils weakened by past slides

    SEATTLE — Earth weakened by previous landslides and soils behaving like water were responsible for the unusual size of a deadly 2014 landslide, two scientists reported October 24 at the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting. Understanding why this landslide was so mobile could help geologists better map the hazards that could lead to others like it and prevent future loss of life....

    10/27/2017 - 15:33 Earth
  • News

    The newest AlphaGo mastered the game with no human input

    AlphaGo just leveled up.

    The latest version of the computer program, dubbed AlphaGo Zero, is the first to master Go, a notoriously complex Chinese board game, without human guidance. Its predecessor — dubbed AlphaGo Lee when it became the first computer program with artificial intelligence, or AI, to defeat a human world champion Go player (SN Online: 3/15/16) — had to study millions of...

    10/18/2017 - 13:00 Artificial Intelligence, Computing, Technology
  • Feature

    José Dinneny rethinks how plants hunt for water

    José Dinneny, 39Plant stress biologistCarnegie Institution for Science 

    José Dinneny wants us to see plants as stranger things.

    “They’re able to integrate information and make coherent decisions without a nervous system, without a brain,” he points out. Plus, plants find water without sight or touch. For too many of us, however, lawns, salads and pots on a sunny windowsill make...

    10/04/2017 - 13:52 Plants, Genetics, Agriculture
  • News

    Animal goo inspires better glue

    Finding a great glue is a sticky task — especially if you want it to attach to something as slick as the inside of the human body. Even the strongest human-made adhesives don’t work well on wet surfaces like tissues and organs. For surgeons closing internal incisions, that’s more than an annoyance. The right glue could hold wounds together as effectively as stitches and staples with less...

    09/15/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Materials, Biomedicine