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  • car-t cell
  • Cotopaxi, volcano in Ecuador
  • two northern quolls
Your search has returned 2137 articles:
  • Feature

    How to make CAR-T cell therapies for cancer safer and more effective

    This wasn’t 15-year-old Connor McMahon’s first time in the hospital. But the 107° fever he’d been running for three days had his dad frightened. The teen was hallucinating, talking gibberish and spouting curses.

    “I thought he was going to die,” says Connor’s father, Don McMahon, who stayed close as his son received and recovered from an experimental treatment for leukemia. “It was really...

    06/27/2018 - 09:00 Cancer, Health, Clinical Trials
  • News

    This volcano revealed its unique ‘voice’ after an eruption

    Ecuador’s Cotopaxi volcano has a deep and distinct voice. Between late 2015 and early 2016, Cotopaxi repeated an unusual pattern of low-frequency sounds that researchers now say is linked to the unique geometry of the interior of its crater. Identifying the distinct “voiceprint” of various volcanoes could help scientists better anticipate changes within the craters, including those that...

    06/25/2018 - 07:00 Earth
  • News

    In a conservation catch-22, efforts to save quolls might endanger them

    Conservationists are stuck in a catch-22: In trying to save some species, the would-be protectors may be giving the animals an evolutionary disadvantage. A new study describes how efforts to protect the endangered northern quoll, a spotted, kitten-sized marsupial native to Australia, by placing a population on a threat-free island may have actually undermined a key survival instinct.

    ...

    06/07/2018 - 12:33 Animals, Conservation, Ecology, Evolution
  • Exhibit

    ‘Outbreak’ puts the life cycle of an epidemic on display

    In 1918, a pandemic of Spanish flu killed as much as 5 percent of the world’s population. A hundred years later, scientists know much more about how to prevent and treat such diseases. But in some ways, the threat of a global outbreak is greater than ever. All it takes is one plane ride for a few localized cases of a disease to become an epidemic.

    A new exhibit at the Smithsonian...

    06/04/2018 - 07:00 Health, Microbes, Animals
  • News

    Mysterious neutrino surplus hints at the existence of new particles

    Pip-squeak particles called neutrinos are dishing out more than scientists had bargained for.

    A particle detector has spotted a puzzling abundance of the lightweight subatomic particles and their antimatter partners, antineutrinos, physicists report May 30 at arXiv.org. The finding mirrors a neutrino excess found more than two decades ago. And that match has researchers wondering if a...

    06/01/2018 - 15:45 Particle Physics
  • Feature

    Are we ready for the deadly heat waves of the future?

    Some victims were found at home. An 84-year-old woman who’d spent over half her life in the same Sacramento, Calif., apartment died near her front door, gripping her keys. A World War II veteran succumbed in his bedroom. Many died outside, including a hiker who perished on the Pacific Crest Trail, his water bottles empty.

    The killer? Heat. Hundreds of others lost their lives when a...

    04/03/2018 - 15:00 Health, Climate
  • News

    Pollution regulations help Chesapeake Bay seagrass rebound

    Underwater grasses are growing back in the Chesapeake Bay. The plants now carpet three times as much real estate as in 1984, thanks to more than 30 years of efforts to reduce nitrogen pollution. This environmental success story shows that regulations put in place to protect the bay’s health have made a difference, researchers report the week of March 5 in Proceedings of the National Academy of...

    03/05/2018 - 15:00 Ecosystems, Oceans, Plants
  • News

    Zika may not be the only virus of its kind that can damage a fetus

    Zika virus may not be the black sheep of the family. Infections with either of two related viruses also cause fetal defects in mice, researchers find.

    Some scientists have speculated that Zika’s capacity to harm a fetus might be unique among its kind, perhaps due to a recent change in the virus’s genetic material (SN: 10/28/17, p. 9). Others have argued that perhaps this dangerous...

    01/31/2018 - 14:21 Biomedicine, Health
  • Science Ticker

    The largest known prime number has 23 million-plus digits

    There’s a new largest known prime number in town, with a whopping 23,249,425 digits. The figure is calculated by multiplying 2 by itself 77,232,917 times and then subtracting 1. Announced on January 3, the number is almost a million digits longer than the last record-breaking prime.

    A prime number can’t be divided by anything other than 1 and itself. If you started counting at 1, you’d...

    01/05/2018 - 07:00 Numbers
  • Science Visualized

    How freezing a soap bubble turns it into a ‘snow globe’

    View the video

    Frigid air can transform an ordinary soap bubble into a glittery “snow globe.” No shaking required.

    When a bubble is placed in a freezer set to –20° Celsius, delicate ice crystals swirl gracefully across the soapy film, gradually growing larger until the bubble freezes solid. The phenomenon can also be observed when blowing soap bubbles outside in wintry weather....

    12/05/2017 - 15:00 Physics, Materials