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Your search has returned 2118 articles:
  • News

    Long-lasting mental health isn’t normal

    Abnormal is the new normal in mental health.

    A small, poorly understood segment of the population stays mentally healthy from age 11 to 38, a new study of New Zealanders finds. Everyone else encounters either temporary or long-lasting mental disorders.

    Only 171 of 988 participants, or 17 percent, experienced no anxiety disorders, depression or other mental ailments from late...

    02/07/2017 - 12:58 Psychology, Mental Health
  • News

    Debate heats up over claims that hot water sometimes freezes faster than cold

    It seems logical to expect cold water to freeze faster than hot, but some experiments have suggested the opposite. There’s now a new explanation for why hot water might freeze faster than cold under certain conditions. The phenomenon, known as the Mpemba effect, may be due to the properties of the bonds that link up neighboring water molecules, a team of chemists reports. Yet other researchers...

    01/06/2017 - 10:37 Chemistry
  • Feature

    Year in review: AlphaGo scores a win for artificial intelligence

    In a hotel ballroom in Seoul, South Korea, early in 2016, a centuries-old strategy game offered a glimpse into the fantastic future of computing.

    The computer program AlphaGo bested a world champion player at the Chinese board game Go, four games to one (SN Online: 3/15/16). The victory shocked Go players and computer gurus alike. “It happened much faster than people expected,” says...

    12/14/2016 - 07:33 Computing, Technology
  • Science Ticker

    Graphene Silly Putty detects pitter-patter of spider footsteps

    Graphene-infused Silly Putty forms an electrical sensor that is sensitive enough to detect the gentle caresses of spider feet walking across it.

    Mixing graphene, or atom-thick sheets of carbon, and polysilicone, the substance found in the children’s toy Silly Putty, made it conduct electricity. Its electrical resistance was highly sensitive to pressure: Squishing the putty caused the...

    12/08/2016 - 14:00 Materials, Technology
  • News

    Training for parents may lessen some autism symptoms in kids

    Training parents to better communicate with their children with autism spectrum disorder may lead to long-lasting improvements in certain symptoms, scientists report online in the Oct. 25 Lancet.

    The results are “very encouraging,” because they show long-term benefits for a relatively low-intensity treatment — one that’s delivered by parents, says clinical psychologist Geraldine Dawson,...

    10/25/2016 - 18:30 Health, Psychology
  • Scicurious

    How gene editing is changing what a lab animal looks like

    Anyone who reads news about science (at Science News or otherwise) will recognize that, like the X-Men or any other superhero franchise, there’s a recurring cast of experimental characters. Instead of Magneto, Professor X, Mystique and the Phoenix, scientists have mice, fruit flies, zebrafish and monkeys. Different types of studies use different stand-ins: Flies for genetics; zebrafish for...

    10/13/2016 - 07:00 Genetics
  • Feature

    CRISPR inspires new tricks to edit genes

    Scientists usually shy away from using the word miracle — unless they’re talking about the gene-editing tool called CRISPR/Cas9. “You can do anything with CRISPR,” some say. Others just call it amazing.

    CRISPR can quickly and efficiently manipulate virtually any gene in any plant or animal. In the four years since CRISPR has been around, researchers have used it to fix genetic diseases...

    08/24/2016 - 07:00 Cells, Genetics
  • News

    Aging-related protein may play role in depression

    A busy protein known for its role in aging may also have a hand in depression, a study on mice hints. Under certain circumstances, the aging-related SIRT1 protein seems to make mice despondent, scientists report August 10 in the Journal of Neuroscience. The results are preliminary, but they might ultimately help find new depression treatments.

    Today’s treatments aren’t always effective,...

    08/09/2016 - 17:00 Neuroscience, Biomedicine, Health
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder animal flight

    Flightless perks

    Galápagos cormorants are the only cormorant species with wings too small to fly, and broken cellular antennae that transmit garbled developmental messages are probably to blame, Tina Hesman Saey reportedin “How a Galápagos bird got tiny wings” (SN: 6/11/16, p. 11).

    Online reader Mark S. wondered if the inability to fly conveyed any advantages to the cormorants.

    It...

    07/27/2016 - 16:14 Animals, Biophysics, Health
  • Feature

    Iron-loving elements tell stories of Earth’s history

    View the slideshow

    Four and a half billion years ago, after Earth’s fiery birth, the infant planet began to radically reshape itself, separating into distinct layers. Metals — mostly iron with a bit of nickel — fell toward the center to form a core. The growing core also vacuumed up other metallic elements, such as platinum, iridium and gold.

    By the time the core finished forming,...

    07/27/2016 - 07:00 Earth, Chemistry