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Your search has returned 9 articles:
  • News

    Biohazard: Smoking before or after pregnancy may harm daughters' fertility

    Exposing female mice to chemicals found in cigarette smoke before pregnancy or during the period in which they nurse their young impairs the reproductive capacity of their female offspring, a new study finds.

    Many women stop smoking when they discover they are pregnant, aware that this habit endangers the baby. The new data suggest that may not be enough to protect their daughters' long...

    11/20/2007 - 14:21 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Talking Turkey (with recipe)

    They can weigh in at 40 pounds or more. They prefer walking, but they can fly. And if Benjamin Franklin had had his way, they would be the U.S. national symbol. We're talking turkey–wild turkey, that is.

    This animal "is purely an American fowl and has no counterpart in other continents," noted Louis A. Stahmer in his 1923 review of the bird. In fact, the...

    11/26/2003 - 20:36 Nutrition
  • Feature

    On Shifting Ground

    Earthquakes now endanger more people than ever. The world population has more than doubled in the past 50 years and, by 2007, half of the planet's 6.6 billion people will be living in urban centers. Because more than 380 major cities lie on or near unstable seams in the Earth's crust, one seismologist has come to a grim conclusion: A catastrophic temblor sufficient to kill 1 million people...

    08/19/2003 - 11:18 Earth
  • Feature

    Herbal Lottery

    Echinacea is a commercial success. The dietary supplement–made from the flowers, stems, and leaves of the purple coneflower–has become a popular and lucrative over-the-counter cold remedy. It's also one of the few nutraceuticals–natural products with medicinal reputations–that have substantial scientific evidence to support its purported functions: Various studies suggest that echinacea...

    06/02/2003 - 18:34 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Drama in Numbers

    As the curtain rises, an illuminated mathematical expression dominates the scene. "Do you see that theorem?" the narrator asks. "In 1637, Pierre de Fermat . . . wrote it down in the margin of a book. Then he added this tantalizing note." A spotlight suddenly reveals a bearded, bewigged, flashily dressed Fermat, who promptly sings,

    "I have discovered a truly...

    12/16/2002 - 13:38 Numbers
  • Feature

    Mad Deer Disease?

    This autumn, the nation's big-game hunters are lifting their guns and bows in the service of science. They're collecting the biggest sample ever of deer and elk brains–predicted to total 200,000–to test for a once-obscure wildlife disease that's become the stuff of headlines and headaches coast-to-coast. So-called chronic wasting disease strikes mule deer, white-tailed deer, and elk. It

    ...
    11/26/2002 - 16:23 Animals
  • News

    Stopping batteries from starting fires

    A new flame-retardant substance can prevent rechargeable lithium-ion batteries from overheating and perhaps starting a fire, researchers say. With such an additive, the light-but-powerful batteries now used in small consumer electronics could be safely scaled up to power cars and other large, energy-hungry machines.

    Jai Prakash and his colleagues at the Illinois Institute of Technology...

    08/13/2002 - 11:24 Chemistry
  • Feature

    Cultures of Reason

    In July 1931, Russian psychologist Alexander R. Luria led a scientific expedition to central Asia to probe the minds of nomads who lived in that harsh, mountainous region. Luria wanted to explore whether members of what scholars at the time ranked as "primitive" communities could reason logically, like inhabitants of modern European and North American societies.

    He got a rude shock....

    06/21/2002 - 16:35 Anthropology
  • Feature

    Gadgets from the Quantum Spookhouse

    Computers exploiting the oddities of quantum mechanics may eventually put conventional computers to shame. Theoretically, full-fledged versions of those quantum machines will someday master in an eye blink mathematical puzzles and secret codes that current supercomputers wouldn't crack with a billion years of number crunching.

    The exotic innards of such quantum computers...

    12/04/2001 - 13:41 Technology