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Your search has returned 19 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling in farming.

    ...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    When Kids Eat Out

    Adolescents are increasingly dining out on fried foods, a new study finds, and the older they are the more frequently they do so. Those trends may portend hefty risks down the line, the authors argue, because the youngsters who ate out most often were generally the heaviest kids and they gained the most weight over the course of a year.

    These are worrisome prospects in this...

    10/05/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Telltale Charts

    When Umesh Khot attended medical school in the early 1990s, his instructors taught him and his fellow students the four warning signs of heart disease: high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and cigarette use. Large studies in the 1960s and 1970s, such as the well-known Framingham Heart Study, had established these links. However, the instructors informed the students of "the 50...

    01/26/2004 - 12:06 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Talking Turkey (with recipe)

    They can weigh in at 40 pounds or more. They prefer walking, but they can fly. And if Benjamin Franklin had had his way, they would be the U.S. national symbol. We're talking turkey–wild turkey, that is.

    This animal "is purely an American fowl and has no counterpart in other continents," noted Louis A. Stahmer in his 1923 review of the bird. In fact, the...

    11/26/2003 - 20:36 Nutrition
  • News

    Do Arctic diets protect prostates?

    Prostate cancer's prevalence and its increase with age tend to be consistent from country to country. A new study finds one major exception to this cancer's high prevalence in older men: Arctic Inuit populations.

    Assessments of cancer in Inuit groups in Alaska, Canada, and Greenland had hinted that prostate cancer's incidence among the Inuit is unusually low. To rule out the possibility...

    10/13/2003 - 19:57 Nutrition
  • Feature

    On Shifting Ground

    Earthquakes now endanger more people than ever. The world population has more than doubled in the past 50 years and, by 2007, half of the planet's 6.6 billion people will be living in urban centers. Because more than 380 major cities lie on or near unstable seams in the Earth's crust, one seismologist has come to a grim conclusion: A catastrophic temblor sufficient to kill 1 million people...

    08/19/2003 - 11:18 Earth
  • Feature

    Old Worms, New Aging Genes

    For more than a decade, Cynthia Kenyon has watched microscopic worms of the species Caenorhabditis elegans live far longer than they should. She has seen mutant strains of this worm, which is normally dead and gone after a mere 2 or 3 weeks, last well into their second month. It's as if a person lived to be 200 years old. Kenyon's long-lived worms are a result of mutations in individual genes...

    07/28/2003 - 13:13 Other
  • News

    Flawed Therapy: Hormone replacement takes more hits

    Expectations for hormone-replacement therapy for postmenopausal women have turned topsy-turvy in recent years. Initial studies suggesting remarkable benefits from the drugs gave way to reports of little gain. Most recently, the rap sheet on estrogen and progestin includes signs of harm.

    The latest bad news for the treatment appears in two articles in the May 28 Journal of the American...

    05/28/2003 - 13:20 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Dietary Dilemmas

    This time of year, thoughts turn from overloaded holiday tables to overweight bodies, the beach, and diet programs. Losing weight is not just a matter of looking good in a swimsuit. Packing on the pounds increases a person's risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, and some cancers. Recent surveys estimate that more than 50 percent of adults in the United States are...

    02/05/2003 - 08:57 Nutrition