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Your search has returned 34 articles:
  • News

    Persistent Prions: Soilbound agents are more potent

    Deformed proteins called prions cause fatal brain-destroying disorders, such as chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and mad cow disease, which can infect people. Evidence suggests that prions make their way into animals' nervous systems through ingestion, but scientists aren't sure.

    A new study shows that prions become more infectious when they latch on to soil particles that...

    07/18/2007 - 13:58 Biomedicine
  • News

    A smart pill for seniors?

    From Washington, D.C., at the Experimental Biology 2007 Conference

    Many people approaching retirement age find that memories fade and quick-wittedness flags. Scientists at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell have formulated what they call a "smart pill" to optimize brain health in such people. In pilot trials, its combination of dietary supplements boosted performance on simple...

    05/08/2007 - 14:49 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Counterintuitive Toxicity

    For decades, researchers largely assumed that a poison's effects increase as the dose rises and diminish as it falls. However, scientists are increasingly documenting unexpected effects—sometimes disproportionately adverse, sometimes beneficial—at extremely low doses of radiation and toxic chemicals.

    Consider the environmentally ubiquitous plastic-softening agent, di-2-ethylhexyl...

    01/16/2007 - 14:07 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • News

    Prions' dirty little secret

    Fifteen years ago, scientists at the National Institutes of Health reported that malformed prions—proteins that can trigger lethal illnesses including mad cow disease—remain on soil surfaces for at least 3 years. Now, scientists report why rain doesn't flush away the prions: The proteins bind almost irreversibly to clay.

    In fact, clay can "retain up to its own mass of ... prion proteins...

    02/07/2006 - 13:58 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Inflammation-Fighting Fat

    Arthritis-ameliorating cheese, anyone? Asthma-moderating yogurt? How about a scoop of lupus-fighting ice cream? Although such foods don't yet exist, they might one day. Data from a new study finds that an unusual fatty acid, a type of dairy fat, can modulate the injurious, runaway inflammation that underlies these and many other diseases.

    The agent is a variant of the essential...

    10/26/2005 - 15:36 Nutrition
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    To Fight Cataracts, It's Fish Yea, Mayo Nay

    Bad news for mayonnaise lovers. A pair of new studies from a Boston research team links this condiment, as well as certain vegetable oils, to an elevated risk of age-related cataracts. One of those studies, however, also suggests that oily fish, the type with dark flesh, hold cataracts at bay.

    Age-related cataracts are the leading cause of blindness. Indeed, cataract...

    05/11/2005 - 21:20 Nutrition
  • News

    Zinc boosts kids' learning

    Zinc supplements can help children learn certain tasks, a new federal study suggests. Because nearly all the children already had diets supplying the recommended amount of the mineral, the findings suggest that "the recommended intake may need an adjustment," says study leader James G. Penland of the Agriculture Department's Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, N.D.

    Penland...

    04/27/2005 - 11:30 Nutrition
  • News

    Wafting pesticides taint far-flung frogs

    Federal researchers have added new evidence to the growing case that agricultural pesticides blowing into California's wilderness areas have played a role in mysterious declines in frog populations.

    Traces of the common pesticides Diazinon and chlorpyrifos showed up in more than half the Pacific tree frogs sampled in Yosemite National Park, but in only 9 percent of the frogs...

    11/15/2004 - 12:33 Earth & Environment