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Your search has returned 47 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    No Peanuts for Your Peanut

    Peanuts are a protein-rich snack food packing plenty of vitamins and trace nutrients. However, these legumes can elicit potentially life-threatening immune reactions within the one in 100 American adults who are allergic to them. Rates of peanut allergy are even higher among children. And the really disturbing news: A new study finds that the age at which this common food allergy first shows...

    12/11/2007 - 08:49 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Sour Genes, Yes—Salty Genes, No

    Some people abhor broccoli, complaining about its intensely bitter taste. Others (myself included) find broccoli's flavor interesting and pleasing—decidedly, not bitter. What leads to our differing culinary opinions is the possession of, or lack of, (in my case, evidently) genes conferring a super sensitivity to bitter taste. Science has recognized such genetic differences for at least a...

    07/18/2007 - 09:52 Science & Society
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling in farming.

    ...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Caffeinated Liver Defense

    What you drink may greatly affect your vulnerability to potentially life-threatening liver disease, a new study finds.

    The liver, the body's largest solid organ, is a metabolic workhorse. It not only makes a host of proteins and blood-clotting factors, but also synthesizes and helps break down fats, secretes a substance that helps the body absorb fat and fat-soluble vitamins, and...

    01/17/2006 - 21:27 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Fruits and Veggies Limit Inflammatory Protein (with recipe)

    Over the past few years, many studies have linked an increased risk of debilitating illness—such as heart disease or diabetes—with chronically elevated blood concentrations of a protein typically associated with inflammation. In many cases, people with the indicated illnesses didn't even have a particularly level of inflammation. The good news: A new trial finds that eating plenty of fruits...

    12/01/2005 - 14:38 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    'Harmless' Alga Indicted for Mussel Poisoning

    Over the past decade, scores of Europeans have been poisoned by eating mussels harvested at various sites along the coast of Ireland. In one of the more-notorious events, 12 people on the small island of Arranmore in 1997 succumbed to severe nausea, vomiting, cramps, headaches, and diarrhea. The irony was that although pesticides or other pollutants were at first suspected, this bout of food...

    01/25/2005 - 15:44 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot's original tint,...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Frozen Assets

    Ninety percent of the nation's dairy cows—some 8.2 million animals—belong to a single breed: Holstein. Owing to the dairy industry's extensive reliance on artificial insemination using semen from only the choicest bulls, this Holstein population is heavily inbred. "Today, it's as if there were only about 35 unrelated cows [contributing genes to] our national Holstein herd," explains...

    11/09/2004 - 11:55 Agriculture