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Your search has returned 30 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    No Peanuts for Your Peanut

    Peanuts are a protein-rich snack food packing plenty of vitamins and trace nutrients. However, these legumes can elicit potentially life-threatening immune reactions within the one in 100 American adults who are allergic to them. Rates of peanut allergy are even higher among children. And the really disturbing news: A new study finds that the age at which this common food allergy first shows...

    12/11/2007 - 08:49 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • News

    Easy Answers: Quantum computer gives results without running

    Physicists have long known that quantum computers have the potential to race through calculations trillions of times as fast as ordinary computers do. Now, it seems that those machines may not have to calculate at all to deliver answers.

    That seemingly absurd possibility, which was advanced as a theory several years ago, has now received experimental verification. What's more, although...

    02/22/2006 - 12:18 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Caffeinated Liver Defense

    What you drink may greatly affect your vulnerability to potentially life-threatening liver disease, a new study finds.

    The liver, the body's largest solid organ, is a metabolic workhorse. It not only makes a host of proteins and blood-clotting factors, but also synthesizes and helps break down fats, secretes a substance that helps the body absorb fat and fat-soluble vitamins, and...

    01/17/2006 - 21:27 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    When Kids Eat Out

    Adolescents are increasingly dining out on fried foods, a new study finds, and the older they are the more frequently they do so. Those trends may portend hefty risks down the line, the authors argue, because the youngsters who ate out most often were generally the heaviest kids and they gained the most weight over the course of a year.

    These are worrisome prospects in this...

    10/05/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot's original tint,...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Frozen Assets

    Ninety percent of the nation's dairy cows—some 8.2 million animals—belong to a single breed: Holstein. Owing to the dairy industry's extensive reliance on artificial insemination using semen from only the choicest bulls, this Holstein population is heavily inbred. "Today, it's as if there were only about 35 unrelated cows [contributing genes to] our national Holstein herd," explains...

    11/09/2004 - 11:55 Agriculture
  • News

    Vitamin E targets dangerous inflammation

    People with diabetes face a high risk of heart attack and stroke. One apparent culprit is the chronic, low-grade inflammation that they develop. Megadoses of vitamin E can dramatically reduce that inflammation, a new study finds.

    Ishwarlal Jialal and Sridevi Devaraj of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas studied 47 men and women with adult-onset, or type II,...

    06/18/2004 - 16:31 Biomedicine
  • News

    Green tea takes on poison

    Dioxin, a carcinogenic by-product of many combustion processes, is ubiquitous throughout the environment, including in the food people eat. One way to protect against this contaminant could rely on natural plant compounds that short-circuit dioxin's toxicity. A new study finds that green tea contains several such agents and suggests that other dietary staples might offer protection against...

    06/07/2004 - 21:20 Nutrition