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Your search has returned 36 articles:
  • News

    Fabulon: Looking less fabulous

    Researchers have tentatively linked polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in people—and their dwellings—with Fabulon, a product used throughout the late 1950s and 1960s as a durable top coat for hardwood floors.

    During a survey of 120 homes on Cape Cod, Mass., researchers found two houses with unusually high PCB concentrations in air and house dust. Residents in both homes remembered a...

    01/30/2008 - 10:27 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Persistent Prions: Soilbound agents are more potent

    Deformed proteins called prions cause fatal brain-destroying disorders, such as chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and mad cow disease, which can infect people. Evidence suggests that prions make their way into animals' nervous systems through ingestion, but scientists aren't sure.

    A new study shows that prions become more infectious when they latch on to soil particles that...

    07/18/2007 - 13:58 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Infectious Foie Gras?

    Amyloid, a term for a misfolded form of an otherwise normal protein, is most often associated with amyloid-beta, the waxy protein that builds up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. But at least 20 other kinds of amyloid, each derived from a different protein, can crop up in various parts of the body. What such malformed proteins have in common is their hairlike shape and...

    06/28/2007 - 11:27 Nutrition
  • News

    Fish Killer Caught? Ephemeral Pfiesteria compound surfaces

    A team of researchers claims to have found an elusive algal toxin implicated in massive fish kills along the Mid-Atlantic coast in the 1990s. They say that the compound's characteristics explain why it has been so difficult to track down. Other researchers, however, remain skeptical.

    The hunt for a toxic product of the single-celled alga Pfiesteria piscicida dates to the early...

    01/17/2007 - 08:43 Chemistry
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • News

    Novel Approach: Cancer drug might ease scleroderma

    The chemotherapy drug paclitaxel, when given to mice, shows signs of impeding the skin disease scleroderma, researchers report. By slowing skin thickening, paclitaxel might offer a treatment for a disease that has defied cure.

    Scleroderma results when excess collagen protein accumulates in the skin, rendering it fibrous and inflexible. This toughening can cause pain and disfigurement....

    11/16/2005 - 13:47 Biomedicine
  • News

    Killer Findings: Scientists piece together 1918-flu virus

    The "Spanish" flu killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million people worldwide between 1918 and 1919. Hoping to prevent such a deadly outbreak from recurring, scientists have long strived to figure out what characteristics differentiate that strain from other, more-benign varieties. Because researchers have lacked live samples of the killer virus, however, they couldn't answer this pivotal...

    10/05/2005 - 09:46 Other
  • Food for Thought

    Money Matters in Obesity

    What's the answer to the nation's growing epidemic of obesity? "Get people to eat less and exercise more" might be obvious—but that's easier said than done, say Allen M. Spiegel and Barbara M. Alving of the National Institutes of Health.

    That's why the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has published the pair's comments, along with those from a host of other...

    07/14/2005 - 13:33 Nutrition
  • News

    Brain Power: Stem cells put a check on nerve disorders

    Famous for their capacity to turn into any type of nerve cell, adult neural stem cells can also serve as anti-inflammation police in the brain, researchers have found. When injected into mice with an inflammatory brain disorder similar to multiple sclerosis, these versatile cells home in on and destroy certain bloodborne inflammatory immune cells.

    In addition to serving as a source of...

    07/13/2005 - 11:30 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Star Wars Goes Organic

    M&M chocolate-candy commercials are among the more entertaining on television. In the latest one, a plain and a peanut M&M character meet with Darth Vader of Star Wars. After a little muscular persuasion by Darth, the M&M guys announce they'll join "the dark side."

    M&M/Mars calls this its first installment in "Chocolate M-pire," an ad...

    05/19/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition