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Your search has returned 11 articles:
  • News

    Biohazard: Smoking before or after pregnancy may harm daughters' fertility

    Exposing female mice to chemicals found in cigarette smoke before pregnancy or during the period in which they nurse their young impairs the reproductive capacity of their female offspring, a new study finds.

    Many women stop smoking when they discover they are pregnant, aware that this habit endangers the baby. The new data suggest that may not be enough to protect their daughters' long...

    11/20/2007 - 14:21 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Omega-3's May Hit Food Labels

    The Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will allow food manufacturers to make health claims for two omega-3 fatty acids—oils typically found in coldwater fish. Food labels can now note that products containing these oils might provide some protection from heart disease.

    The oils carry unwieldy names and so go by their acronyms: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and...

    09/22/2004 - 18:36 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Talking Turkey (with recipe)

    They can weigh in at 40 pounds or more. They prefer walking, but they can fly. And if Benjamin Franklin had had his way, they would be the U.S. national symbol. We're talking turkey–wild turkey, that is.

    This animal "is purely an American fowl and has no counterpart in other continents," noted Louis A. Stahmer in his 1923 review of the bird. In fact, the...

    11/26/2003 - 20:36 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Old Worms, New Aging Genes

    For more than a decade, Cynthia Kenyon has watched microscopic worms of the species Caenorhabditis elegans live far longer than they should. She has seen mutant strains of this worm, which is normally dead and gone after a mere 2 or 3 weeks, last well into their second month. It's as if a person lived to be 200 years old. Kenyon's long-lived worms are a result of mutations in individual genes...

    07/28/2003 - 13:13
  • Feature

    Herbal Lottery

    Echinacea is a commercial success. The dietary supplement–made from the flowers, stems, and leaves of the purple coneflower–has become a popular and lucrative over-the-counter cold remedy. It's also one of the few nutraceuticals–natural products with medicinal reputations–that have substantial scientific evidence to support its purported functions: Various studies suggest that echinacea...

    06/02/2003 - 18:34 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Drama in Numbers

    As the curtain rises, an illuminated mathematical expression dominates the scene. "Do you see that theorem?" the narrator asks. "In 1637, Pierre de Fermat . . . wrote it down in the margin of a book. Then he added this tantalizing note." A spotlight suddenly reveals a bearded, bewigged, flashily dressed Fermat, who promptly sings,

    "I have discovered a truly...

    12/16/2002 - 13:38 Numbers
  • Feature

    Drama in Numbers

    As the curtain rises, an illuminated mathematical expression dominates the scene. "Do you see that theorem?" the narrator asks. "In 1637, Pierre de Fermat . . . wrote it down in the margin of a book. Then he added this tantalizing note." A spotlight suddenly reveals a bearded, bewigged, flashily dressed Fermat, who promptly sings,

    "I have discovered a truly...

    12/16/2002 - 13:38 Numbers
  • Feature

    Mad Deer Disease?

    This autumn, the nation's big-game hunters are lifting their guns and bows in the service of science. They're collecting the biggest sample ever of deer and elk brains–predicted to total 200,000–to test for a once-obscure wildlife disease that's become the stuff of headlines and headaches coast-to-coast. So-called chronic wasting disease strikes mule deer, white-tailed deer, and elk. It

    ...
    11/26/2002 - 16:23 Animals
  • News

    Three Dog Eves: Canine diaspora from East Asia to Americas

    Two genetic studies have just rewritten the history of humanity's best friend. The new version has moved the origins of the domestic dog from the Middle East to East Asia and argues that the first people to venture into the Americas brought their dogs with them.

    Analysis of 654 dogs from around the world suggests that their earliest female ancestors originated from several...

    11/20/2002 - 14:41
  • Feature

    Gadgets from the Quantum Spookhouse

    Computers exploiting the oddities of quantum mechanics may eventually put conventional computers to shame. Theoretically, full-fledged versions of those quantum machines will someday master in an eye blink mathematical puzzles and secret codes that current supercomputers wouldn't crack with a billion years of number crunching.

    The exotic innards of such quantum computers...

    12/04/2001 - 13:41 Technology