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Your search has returned 40 articles:
  • News

    A smart pill for seniors?

    From Washington, D.C., at the Experimental Biology 2007 Conference

    Many people approaching retirement age find that memories fade and quick-wittedness flags. Scientists at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell have formulated what they call a "smart pill" to optimize brain health in such people. In pilot trials, its combination of dietary supplements boosted performance on simple...

    05/08/2007 - 14:49 Nutrition
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • News

    Novel Approach: Cancer drug might ease scleroderma

    The chemotherapy drug paclitaxel, when given to mice, shows signs of impeding the skin disease scleroderma, researchers report. By slowing skin thickening, paclitaxel might offer a treatment for a disease that has defied cure.

    Scleroderma results when excess collagen protein accumulates in the skin, rendering it fibrous and inflexible. This toughening can cause pain and disfigurement....

    11/16/2005 - 13:47 Biomedicine
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    To Fight Cataracts, It's Fish Yea, Mayo Nay

    Bad news for mayonnaise lovers. A pair of new studies from a Boston research team links this condiment, as well as certain vegetable oils, to an elevated risk of age-related cataracts. One of those studies, however, also suggests that oily fish, the type with dark flesh, hold cataracts at bay.

    Age-related cataracts are the leading cause of blindness. Indeed, cataract...

    05/11/2005 - 21:20 Nutrition
  • News

    A quantum fluid pipes up

    Helium never ceases to amaze. Physicists have now heard a quantum-mechanical whistle emanating from two reservoirs of liquid helium-4 that were separated by a perforated membrane.

    According to theory, when liquid helium is pushed through a tiny hole at ultracold temperatures, the substance oscillates at a frequency that, when amplified electronically, sounds like a whistle.

    Other...

    02/22/2005 - 14:11 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Trimming with Tea

    Here's a new diet drink to help people shed pounds: oolong tea enriched with some of the antioxidant compounds that naturally occur in green tea. Men who drank this hybrid brew during a 3-month study in Japan lost 1.1 more kilograms in weight than did men drinking conventional oolong tea—with no other difference in their respective diets or exercise.

    The hybrid tea also...

    02/09/2005 - 13:29 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot's original tint,...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Frozen Assets

    Ninety percent of the nation's dairy cows—some 8.2 million animals—belong to a single breed: Holstein. Owing to the dairy industry's extensive reliance on artificial insemination using semen from only the choicest bulls, this Holstein population is heavily inbred. "Today, it's as if there were only about 35 unrelated cows [contributing genes to] our national Holstein herd," explains...

    11/09/2004 - 11:55 Agriculture