Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Search Content

E.g., 10/15/2018
E.g., 10/15/2018
Your search has returned 35 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Caffeinated Liver Defense

    What you drink may greatly affect your vulnerability to potentially life-threatening liver disease, a new study finds.

    The liver, the body's largest solid organ, is a metabolic workhorse. It not only makes a host of proteins and blood-clotting factors, but also synthesizes and helps break down fats, secretes a substance that helps the body absorb fat and fat-soluble vitamins...

    01/17/2006 - 21:27 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    When Kids Eat Out

    Adolescents are increasingly dining out on fried foods, a new study finds, and the older they are the more frequently they do so. Those trends may portend hefty risks down the line, the authors argue, because the youngsters who ate out most often were generally the heaviest kids and they gained the most weight over the course of a year.

    These are worrisome prospects in this...

    10/05/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot'...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Extreme Impersonations

    Extreme physical conditions have a way of bringing out the strangest behaviors that nature can muster. Just ask physicist John E. Thomas. Two years ago, he and his colleagues at Duke University in Durham, N.C., were working with intense lasers in a high-vacuum chamber at temperatures next to absolute zero. They were manipulating tiny clouds of lithium gas. When the scientists turned off the...

    09/11/2004 - 17:58 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Talking Turkey (with recipe)

    They can weigh in at 40 pounds or more. They prefer walking, but they can fly. And if Benjamin Franklin had had his way, they would be the U.S. national symbol. We're talking turkey–wild turkey, that is.

    This animal "is purely an American fowl and has no counterpart in other continents," noted Louis A. Stahmer in his 1923 review of the...

    11/26/2003 - 20:36 Nutrition
  • News

    Do Arctic diets protect prostates?

    Prostate cancer's prevalence and its increase with age tend to be consistent from country to country. A new study finds one major exception to this cancer's high prevalence in older men: Arctic Inuit populations.

    Assessments of cancer in Inuit groups in Alaska, Canada, and Greenland had hinted that prostate cancer's incidence among the Inuit is unusually low. To rule out the possibility...

    10/13/2003 - 19:57 Nutrition
  • News

    Switching Off Pain: Modeling relief on the action of marijuana

    Scientists have long known that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in marijuana, is an effective painkiller. But THC's kaleidoscopic effects, including sedation, giddiness, and paranoia, limit its use in medicine. Now, researchers have fabricated a drug that alleviates pain through a mechanism similar to that of THC, but without the side effects.

    The drug, dubbed AM1241,...

    08/13/2003 - 11:01 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    In Search of a Scientific Revolution

    Plenty of people claim to have theories that will revolutionize science. What's rare is for other scientists to take one of these schemes seriously. Yet that's what's happened since May 2002 when theoretical physicist Stephen Wolfram self-published a book in which he alleged to have found a new way to address the most difficult problems of science. Tellingly, he named this treatise A New Kind...

    08/12/2003 - 12:48 Humans & Society