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Your search has returned 35 articles:
  • Feature

    Old Worms, New Aging Genes

    For more than a decade, Cynthia Kenyon has watched microscopic worms of the species Caenorhabditis elegans live far longer than they should. She has seen mutant strains of this worm, which is normally dead and gone after a mere 2 or 3 weeks, last well into their second month. It's as if a person lived to be 200 years old. Kenyon's long-lived worms are a result of mutations in individual genes...

    07/28/2003 - 13:13
  • News

    Flawed Therapy: Hormone replacement takes more hits

    Expectations for hormone-replacement therapy for postmenopausal women have turned topsy-turvy in recent years. Initial studies suggesting remarkable benefits from the drugs gave way to reports of little gain. Most recently, the rap sheet on estrogen and progestin includes signs of harm.

    The latest bad news for the treatment appears in two articles in the May 28 Journal of the American...

    05/28/2003 - 13:20 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Selenium's Value to Prostate Health

    Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among U.S. men, and internationally it ranks fourth. Though few studies have offered much insight into what triggers this disease, a growing number of researchers have found evidence suggesting that dietary selenium protects men against this cancer.

    Indeed, a February 2003 paper in the International Journal of Cancer found...

    04/28/2003 - 12:48 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Words Get in the Way

    Law-enforcement officials typically solicit descriptions of criminals from eyewitnesses, often just after an offense has occurred. It stands to reason that thorough accounts by those who saw what happened will help investigators round up the likeliest suspects. Eyewitnesses can then pick the criminals out of a lineup. When crime-scene interviewing had its first brush with memory research in...

    04/15/2003 - 10:25
  • Feature

    Dietary Dilemmas

    This time of year, thoughts turn from overloaded holiday tables to overweight bodies, the beach, and diet programs. Losing weight is not just a matter of looking good in a swimsuit. Packing on the pounds increases a person's risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, and some cancers. Recent surveys estimate that more than 50 percent of adults in the United States are...

    02/05/2003 - 08:57 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Drama in Numbers

    As the curtain rises, an illuminated mathematical expression dominates the scene. "Do you see that theorem?" the narrator asks. "In 1637, Pierre de Fermat . . . wrote it down in the margin of a book. Then he added this tantalizing note." A spotlight suddenly reveals a bearded, bewigged, flashily dressed Fermat, who promptly sings,

    "I have discovered a...

    12/16/2002 - 13:38 Numbers
  • Feature

    Drama in Numbers

    As the curtain rises, an illuminated mathematical expression dominates the scene. "Do you see that theorem?" the narrator asks. "In 1637, Pierre de Fermat . . . wrote it down in the margin of a book. Then he added this tantalizing note." A spotlight suddenly reveals a bearded, bewigged, flashily dressed Fermat, who promptly sings,

    "I have discovered a...

    12/16/2002 - 13:38 Numbers
  • News

    Satellite links may don quantum cloaks

    Today's most powerful methods for protecting secret communications may not remain secure tomorrow. That's because they rely on the difficulty of gnarly calculations that may someday succumb to faster computers, scientists say. However, secrecy based on the inviolable laws of nature—if such protection proves technically feasible—will keep spies completely in the dark.

    Researchers now...

    12/10/2002 - 18:35 Technology
  • Feature

    Taming Toxic Tides

    Marine scientists have been documenting a disquieting trend in the past few decades–increasing blooms of poisonous algae. Outbreaks in Chinese coastal waters, for example, increased 10-fold between 1975 and 1995. Many species tint the water a deep hue, from red or blue-green to dirty brown. Others proliferate

    more stealthily. Recognition of their intoxicating...

    11/26/2002 - 15:48 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Four ions mingle in quantum chorus

    A remarkable new quartet makes its debut.

    A Colorado research team has coaxed an unprecedented number of microscopic particles—specifically, four beryllium ions—to share in a strange harmony known as quantum entanglement.

    Moreover, the scientists did it in a way that promises to make entanglements of larger numbers of particles not just possible but attainable on...

    10/02/2002 - 10:48 Physics