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Your search has returned 46 articles:
  • News

    Power from heat

    The thermoelectric effect can produce small amounts of electricity from almost any source of heat, but its low efficiency has so far limited its uses. A team has now found a simple way to make one thermoelectric alloy more efficient.

    When two ends of a stick of a thermoelectric material are exposed to different temperatures, a voltage appears. The electrons in the stick act like the...

    03/26/2008 - 11:25 Technology
  • News

    Fabulon: Looking less fabulous

    Researchers have tentatively linked polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in people—and their dwellings—with Fabulon, a product used throughout the late 1950s and 1960s as a durable top coat for hardwood floors.

    During a survey of 120 homes on Cape Cod, Mass., researchers found two houses with unusually high PCB concentrations in air and house dust. Residents in both homes remembered a...

    01/30/2008 - 10:27 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Caffeine Aids Golden Girls' Mental Health

    Although wine may improve with age, the human body tends to falter during the so-called golden years. Among the most exasperating declines occur in memory and critical aspects of reasoning. However, downing plenty of caffeine-rich coffee—or tea—may offer one low-cost solution for keeping aging wits sharp, a French study finds. The rub: This strategy appears to benefit only women.

    ...
    08/16/2007 - 18:39 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Infectious Foie Gras?

    Amyloid, a term for a misfolded form of an otherwise normal protein, is most often associated with amyloid-beta, the waxy protein that builds up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. But at least 20 other kinds of amyloid, each derived from a different protein, can crop up in various parts of the body. What such malformed proteins have in common is their hairlike shape and...

    06/28/2007 - 11:27 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Chocolate Constituent Bests Fluoride

    "Chocolate Toothpaste? Extract of Tasty Treat Could Fight Tooth Decay."

    That's how Tulane University's news office provocatively titled a press release it issued last week. Sound sweet? Unfortunately, it's anything but. The extract, theobromine, is a bitter constituent of a number of plants, including the beans used to make chocolate. A chemical cousin to caffeine, this...

    05/22/2007 - 17:14 Nutrition
  • News

    A smart pill for seniors?

    From Washington, D.C., at the Experimental Biology 2007 Conference

    Many people approaching retirement age find that memories fade and quick-wittedness flags. Scientists at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell have formulated what they call a "smart pill" to optimize brain health in such people. In pilot trials, its combination of dietary supplements boosted performance on simple...

    05/08/2007 - 14:49 Nutrition
  • News

    Killer Findings: Scientists piece together 1918-flu virus

    The "Spanish" flu killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million people worldwide between 1918 and 1919. Hoping to prevent such a deadly outbreak from recurring, scientists have long strived to figure out what characteristics differentiate that strain from other, more-benign varieties. Because researchers have lacked live samples of the killer virus, however, they couldn't answer this pivotal...

    10/05/2005 - 09:46
  • Food for Thought

    Money Matters in Obesity

    What's the answer to the nation's growing epidemic of obesity? "Get people to eat less and exercise more" might be obvious—but that's easier said than done, say Allen M. Spiegel and Barbara M. Alving of the National Institutes of Health.

    That's why the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has published the pair's comments, along with those from a host of other...

    07/14/2005 - 13:33 Nutrition
  • News

    Brain Power: Stem cells put a check on nerve disorders

    Famous for their capacity to turn into any type of nerve cell, adult neural stem cells can also serve as anti-inflammation police in the brain, researchers have found. When injected into mice with an inflammatory brain disorder similar to multiple sclerosis, these versatile cells home in on and destroy certain bloodborne inflammatory immune cells.

    In addition to serving as a source of...

    07/13/2005 - 11:30 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Star Wars Goes Organic

    M&M chocolate-candy commercials are among the more entertaining on television. In the latest one, a plain and a peanut M&M character meet with Darth Vader of Star Wars. After a little muscular persuasion by Darth, the M&M guys announce they'll join "the dark side."

    M&M/Mars calls this its first installment in "Chocolate M-pire," an ad...

    05/19/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition