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Your search has returned 30 articles:
  • News

    Power from heat

    The thermoelectric effect can produce small amounts of electricity from almost any source of heat, but its low efficiency has so far limited its uses. A team has now found a simple way to make one thermoelectric alloy more efficient.

    When two ends of a stick of a thermoelectric material are exposed to different temperatures, a voltage appears. The electrons in the stick act like the...

    03/26/2008 - 11:25 Technology
  • News

    Escaping flatland

    From Washington, D.C., at a meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology

    Nothing is more iconic of biological research than the petri dish. Yet the idea that growing cells in a flat dish can sometimes lead scientists astray is gaining traction.

    As an alternative, some researchers are experimenting on cells grown in gelatinous materials made from many of the same structural...

    12/11/2007 - 14:40
  • Food for Thought

    No Peanuts for Your Peanut

    Peanuts are a protein-rich snack food packing plenty of vitamins and trace nutrients. However, these legumes can elicit potentially life-threatening immune reactions within the one in 100 American adults who are allergic to them. Rates of peanut allergy are even higher among children. And the really disturbing news: A new study finds that the age at which this common food allergy first shows...

    12/11/2007 - 08:49 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling in farming.

    ...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Caffeinated Liver Defense

    What you drink may greatly affect your vulnerability to potentially life-threatening liver disease, a new study finds.

    The liver, the body's largest solid organ, is a metabolic workhorse. It not only makes a host of proteins and blood-clotting factors, but also synthesizes and helps break down fats, secretes a substance that helps the body absorb fat and fat-soluble vitamins, and...

    01/17/2006 - 21:27 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Fruits and Veggies Limit Inflammatory Protein (with recipe)

    Over the past few years, many studies have linked an increased risk of debilitating illness—such as heart disease or diabetes—with chronically elevated blood concentrations of a protein typically associated with inflammation. In many cases, people with the indicated illnesses didn't even have a particularly level of inflammation. The good news: A new trial finds that eating plenty of fruits...

    12/01/2005 - 14:38 Nutrition
  • News

    Ultrasound solution to toxin pollution

    Blooms of algae that produce life-threatening toxins regularly plague water supplies around the world. In many cases, the algae's toxins can survive standard treatments for purifying water. Researchers at Florida International University in Miami think they have a sound solution: ultrasound.

    Blasting water with 640-kilohertz ultrasound waves briefly creates high-pressure...

    07/20/2005 - 09:44 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    'Harmless' Alga Indicted for Mussel Poisoning

    Over the past decade, scores of Europeans have been poisoned by eating mussels harvested at various sites along the coast of Ireland. In one of the more-notorious events, 12 people on the small island of Arranmore in 1997 succumbed to severe nausea, vomiting, cramps, headaches, and diarrhea. The irony was that although pesticides or other pollutants were at first suspected, this bout of food...

    01/25/2005 - 15:44 Nutrition
  • News

    Low-cal diet may reduce cancer in monkeys

    Here's a fact that people stuffed with Thanksgiving stuffing might well contemplate: According to studies of short-lived species such as worms, flies, and mice, slashing normal calorie consumption by one-third can extend an animal's natural life span and reduce its odds of diseases such as cancer. Researchers monitoring monkeys on calorie-restricted diets have also seen signs that this...

    08/10/2004 - 15:30