Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 03/27/2017
E.g., 03/27/2017
Your search has returned 35 articles:
  • News

    Power from heat

    The thermoelectric effect can produce small amounts of electricity from almost any source of heat, but its low efficiency has so far limited its uses. A team has now found a simple way to make one thermoelectric alloy more efficient.

    When two ends of a stick of a thermoelectric material are exposed to different temperatures, a voltage appears. The electrons in the stick act like the...

    03/26/2008 - 11:25 Technology
  • News

    Escaping flatland

    From Washington, D.C., at a meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology

    Nothing is more iconic of biological research than the petri dish. Yet the idea that growing cells in a flat dish can sometimes lead scientists astray is gaining traction.

    As an alternative, some researchers are experimenting on cells grown in gelatinous materials made from many of the same structural...

    12/11/2007 - 14:40 Other
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling in farming.

    ...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Fruits and Veggies Limit Inflammatory Protein (with recipe)

    Over the past few years, many studies have linked an increased risk of debilitating illness—such as heart disease or diabetes—with chronically elevated blood concentrations of a protein typically associated with inflammation. In many cases, people with the indicated illnesses didn't even have a particularly level of inflammation. The good news: A new trial finds that eating plenty of fruits...

    12/01/2005 - 14:38 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    When Kids Eat Out

    Adolescents are increasingly dining out on fried foods, a new study finds, and the older they are the more frequently they do so. Those trends may portend hefty risks down the line, the authors argue, because the youngsters who ate out most often were generally the heaviest kids and they gained the most weight over the course of a year.

    These are worrisome prospects in this...

    10/05/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Food Colorings

    Crop geneticist Charles R. Brown has spent a decade working to make a better potato. In the beginning, he focused on beefing up the familiar white-fleshed tuber. His strategy was to recapture healthful traits from old-style spuds from the plant's native range in South America. He examined many yellow, red, and purple potatoes, none of which grows well in a U.S. climate. While cross breeding...

    01/03/2005 - 13:56 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot's original tint,...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Frozen Assets

    Ninety percent of the nation's dairy cows—some 8.2 million animals—belong to a single breed: Holstein. Owing to the dairy industry's extensive reliance on artificial insemination using semen from only the choicest bulls, this Holstein population is heavily inbred. "Today, it's as if there were only about 35 unrelated cows [contributing genes to] our national Holstein herd," explains...

    11/09/2004 - 11:55 Agriculture
  • Feature

    Extreme Impersonations

    Extreme physical conditions have a way of bringing out the strangest behaviors that nature can muster. Just ask physicist John E. Thomas. Two years ago, he and his colleagues at Duke University in Durham, N.C., were working with intense lasers in a high-vacuum chamber at temperatures next to absolute zero. They were manipulating tiny clouds of lithium gas. When the scientists turned off the...

    09/11/2004 - 17:58 Physics
  • News

    Infectious stowaways

    While in port, shipping vessels often suck huge quantities of water into their ballast tanks to replace the stabilizing weight of cargo they've off-loaded. Along with this water comes abundant aquatic life, such as mussels and crabs, which journey with the ships—often crossing entire oceans—until the ballast is dumped in preparation for loading new goods.

    Largely ignored in this lively...

    08/10/2004 - 17:48 Earth & Environment