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Your search has returned 36 articles:
  • News

    Laser printers can dirty the air

    The smaller an air-pollution particle is, the more likely it will be inhaled deep into the lungs, where it can trigger disease. A new study finds that office laser printers can spew especially small particles.

    Lidia Morawska of the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, says that her team stumbled onto the finding while attempting to evaluate the effectiveness of...

    09/05/2007 - 14:01 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Cholesterol boosts diesel toxicity

    Cholesterol poses a cardiovascular risk once it becomes transformed into an inflammatory building block of artery-clogging plaque. That process, which happens all the time, is triggered by oxidation. A new study finds that breathing nanoscale particles spewed by diesel-fuel combustion—also a common occurrence—may turn on genes that multiply cholesterol's inflammatory and atherosclerotic risks...

    08/08/2007 - 09:53 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Too Few Jaws: Shark declines let rays overgraze scallops

    A shortage of big sharks along the U.S. East Coast is letting their prey flourish, and that prey is going hog wild, demolishing bay scallop populations.

    That's the conclusion of researchers led by the late Ransom Myers of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, who died this week. Combining census surveys from the past 35 years, Myers' team found shrinking...

    03/28/2007 - 11:47 Animals
  • News

    Fish Killer Caught? Ephemeral Pfiesteria compound surfaces

    A team of researchers claims to have found an elusive algal toxin implicated in massive fish kills along the Mid-Atlantic coast in the 1990s. They say that the compound's characteristics explain why it has been so difficult to track down. Other researchers, however, remain skeptical.

    The hunt for a toxic product of the single-celled alga Pfiesteria piscicida dates to the early...

    01/17/2007 - 08:43 Chemistry
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • News

    Hummingbirds can clock flower refills

    Hummingbirds can keep track of when a particular flower has replenished its nectar and is worth visiting again, say researchers working in the Canadian Rockies.

    That knack may require that hummingbirds have parts of what's called episodic memory, says T. Andrew Hurly of the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. When people recall episodes from their lives, they're remembering what...

    04/11/2006 - 11:54 Animals
  • News

    Leaden streets

    From San Diego, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    When Arlene L. Weiss and her colleagues found that urban house dust tends to contain more lead the closer it is to a frequently opened window, they reasoned that most of the heavy metal arrives from outside. Their new survey now confirms that street grit is the probable source of lead in urban homes and that flaking paint from...

    03/21/2006 - 11:06 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Squirt Alert

    As scientific adviser to a group of Maine watermen, ecologist Larry Harris had heard his share of stories. But one tale, told to him 2 years ago, proved unforgettable. A fisherman related how he had been hauling up a dredge used to scout for scallops in nearby Cobscook Bay when he snagged something novel: a life form resembling blobs of pancake batter.

    In all his...

    12/18/2005 - 18:25 Ecology