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Your search has returned 30 articles:
  • Feature

    Back from the Dead?

    In December 1938, Marjorie Courtney-Latimer, curator of a natural history museum in East London, South Africa, went to the docks to look for interesting specimens among the day's catch. What she found one day she later described as "the most beautiful fish I had ever seen ... a pale mauve blue with iridescent silver markings." The discovery sent scientists into a frenzy.

    ...

    11/13/2007 - 11:15 Paleontology
  • News

    Mafia Cowbirds: Do they muscle birds that don't play ball?

    Cowbirds in Illinois that sneak their eggs into other birds' nests retaliate violently if their scam gets foiled, researchers say.

    The brown-headed cowbirds of North America outsource nest building and chick raising. Female cowbirds dart into other birds' nests, quickly lay eggs, and rush away. The nest owners are left to care for big, demanding cowbird chicks.

    ...
    03/07/2007 - 11:56 Animals
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • News

    Dawn Sneaks: Old birds sing early, cuckold sleepyheads

    Among European birds called blue tits, the early bird gets more than a worm.

    Older males start singing some 5 or 6 minutes earlier in the dawn chorus and attract more of the promiscuous females than younger males do, researchers report in the September issue of Animal Behaviour.

    In Europe, the springtime dawn chorus includes the voices of male blue tits (Cyanistes...

    07/05/2006 - 09:57 Animals
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • News

    Leaden streets

    From San Diego, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    When Arlene L. Weiss and her colleagues found that urban house dust tends to contain more lead the closer it is to a frequently opened window, they reasoned that most of the heavy metal arrives from outside. Their new survey now confirms that street grit is the probable source of lead in urban homes and that flaking paint from...

    03/21/2006 - 11:06 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Urban fish show perturbed spawning cycle

    From Baltimore, at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

    Sediment-dwelling English sole living in and around Seattle's urban waterfront exhibit spawning anomalies that might compromise their reproductive success, a team of aquatic biologists finds. The changes indicate chronic exposure to environmental contaminants that mimic the animals' own estrogen, the...

    12/04/2005 - 17:03
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Light Pedaling: Photonic brakes are vital for circuits

    Just as optical fibers have replaced most electrical wires for long-distance telecommunications, light-based circuits may replace electrical ones in applications involving vast flows of data within computers and networks. Now, a team of industrial researchers has taken what may be a crucial step toward such photonic circuitry: They've found a way to dial down the speed of light within...

    11/02/2005 - 12:01 Physics
  • News

    Save the frogs

    A "metaphorical Noah's Ark" is how Claude Gascon describes the action plan drafted last month at an Amphibian Conservation Summit in Washington, D.C. "If implemented, it would hopefully reverse the trend in amphibian extinctions," says Gascon, an officer of the D.C.–based Conservation International and chairman of the World Conservation Union's Global Amphibian Specialist Group.

    ...

    09/28/2005 - 09:46 Earth & Environment