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Your search has returned 9 articles:
  • News

    Too Few Jaws: Shark declines let rays overgraze scallops

    A shortage of big sharks along the U.S. East Coast is letting their prey flourish, and that prey is going hog wild, demolishing bay scallop populations.

    That's the conclusion of researchers led by the late Ransom Myers of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, who died this week. Combining census surveys from the past 35 years, Myers' team found shrinking...

    03/28/2007 - 11:47 Animals
  • Feature

    Squirt Alert

    As scientific adviser to a group of Maine watermen, ecologist Larry Harris had heard his share of stories. But one tale, told to him 2 years ago, proved unforgettable. A fisherman related how he had been hauling up a dredge used to scout for scallops in nearby Cobscook Bay when he snagged something novel: a life form resembling blobs of pancake batter.

    In all his...

    12/18/2005 - 18:25 Ecology
  • News

    Instant Nano Blocks: One-step process makes trillions of DNA pyramids

    As if carrying life's genetic code weren't enough, DNA molecules are in demand these days as raw material for microscopic constructions. For instance, nanotechnologists have fashioned cubic and octahedral cages from the molecules (SN: 2/14/04, p. 99: Available to subscribers at Snappy DNA: Long strand folds into octahedron). Processes for crafting those frameworks, however, have been arduous...

    12/07/2005 - 11:57 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents on...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • News

    Lithium increases gray matter in the brain

    Able to stabilize the mood swings of many people with manic depression, lithium revolutionized psychiatric therapy when the drug came on the scene several decades ago. Yet neuroscientists remain perplexed at how this potent medication works.

    Scientists in Detroit have now provided a clue that could help resolve that mystery. They find that about a month of treatment with the drug...

    06/18/2004 - 16:13 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Gardens

    Soils in many cities of the United States carry a poisonous legacy: heavy concentrations of lead. The metal was deposited for years as fallout from flaking leaded house paint and the emissions of cars burning leaded gasoline. Recognizing the threat posed by tainted soil, environmental scientists have warned that growing edible plants in soils near streets or within several feet of homes and...

    12/04/2003 - 17:26 Earth & Environment
  • News

    UV-pollutant combo hits tadpoles hard

    From New Orleans, at the e.hormone 2003 Conference

    Many of the studies documenting a global decline in amphibians have linked the shrinking populations with exposure to excessive ultraviolet (UV) sunlight or to pollutants, especially ones with a hormonal effect. Biologists now find that slightly elevated UV exposure reduces the chance that tadpoles will become frogs. That chance...

    11/05/2003 - 09:35 Earth & Environment
  • News

    POPs treaty enacted

    On Oct. 23, a new international treaty–the Protocol on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)–went into effect, although the United States hasn't signed on. Brokered under the aegis of the United Nations, the POPs treaty calls for reduction or elimination of toxic chemicals that are long-lived and have the propensity to travel long distances.

    When first drafted in 2000, this treaty looked...

    11/05/2003 - 06:27 Earth & Environment
  • News

    After Invasions: Can an ant takeover change the rules?

    A rare before-and-after study of the invasion of an exotic species shows the newcomer swiftly disassembling the community, say ant biologists.

    Before Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) swept into a nature preserve in northern California, some 20 species of native ants worked the landscape in largely segregated domains, says Nathan Sanders of Humboldt State University in Arcata, Calif....

    02/26/2003 - 12:53 Ecology