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Your search has returned 9 articles:
  • News

    Uncharted atomic landscapes

    Electron microscopes can now not only image single atoms but also map the locations of different chemical elements in a sample.

    A scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM) operates by sending an atom-thin beam of electrons through a sample. Those electrons lose energy as they kick up the energy of some of the sample's electrons. The energy losses depend on the characteristic...

    08/14/2007 - 13:46 Technology
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Warm Ice: Frozen water forms at room temperature

    Zap a layer of water with a strong electric field and, experiments dating back years suggest, some of the liquid freezes, even at comfortable, shirtsleeve temperatures. New experiments indicate that the electric field needn't be so strong. If this result holds, it would indicate that warm ice could appear on a range of confining surfaces, including the minuscule crevices in ordinary rocks....

    08/24/2005 - 12:00 Physics
  • Feature

    Metal Makeover

    Some of the brass directing U.S. Navy research funding appears to have gone off the deep end: The Navy has been sinking serious money into the possibility of building future warships out of glass. Since the late 19th century, shipbuilders have opted for metals, mainly various grades of steel. Yet recently, military agencies have spent tens of millions of dollars on the concept of boats with...

    11/02/2004 - 10:26 Materials
  • Food for Thought

    Omega-3's May Hit Food Labels

    The Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will allow food manufacturers to make health claims for two omega-3 fatty acids—oils typically found in coldwater fish. Food labels can now note that products containing these oils might provide some protection from heart disease.

    The oils carry unwieldy names and so go by their acronyms: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and...

    09/22/2004 - 18:36 Nutrition
  • Feature

    New PCBs?

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) is hardly a household phrase. Yet it probably should be. Household products ranging from kids' pajamas to computers release these brominated flame retardants. The chemicals have been turning up in house and yard dust, as well as in specimens collected from sewage sludge, streams, and even people's bodies. For 3 decades, manufacturers have been putting...

    10/21/2003 - 10:52 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Hot Flashes, Cold Cuts

    Andrei V. Rode didn't flinch recently when enough power to run 2,000 homes blasted his fingertip. Although staccato bursts of laser light vaporized tiny dots of his flesh, he kept his finger in harm's way. Rode, a physicist at Australian National University in Canberra, was testing something he'd been told: That the lasers he works with blast materials in such a novel way that they can...

    11/12/2002 - 18:56 Technology
  • News

    Writing with warm atoms

    The ultrasharp tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can interact with individual atoms on a surface. Scientists have used this capability to position atoms in microscopic patterns—such as letters of the alphabet—but only at temperatures near absolute zero. Now, John B. Pethica and his coworkers at the University of Oxford in England have demonstrated that they can do the same sort of...

    10/11/2002 - 18:13 Physics
  • Feature

    Dusty Disks May Reveal Hidden Worlds

    Like a crab scuttling through sand, an orbiting planet leaves a telltale trail in the dust surrounding its parent star. Astronomers began scouring nearby stars for such trails nearly 2 decades ago, but telescopes provided only fuzzy images. With the keen-sighted instruments available today, however, the dust trails are coming into sharper focus, opening the way to finding and characterizing...

    04/30/2002 - 11:46 Astronomy