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Your search has returned 23 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    It's Spud Time

    As 2007 winds down, thoughts naturally turn towards what might lie ahead. Meals rich in high-carb tubers, perhaps? That's what the United Nations would like everyone to contemplate throughout 2008, which it is designating the International Year of the Potato.

    Farmers now harvest more than 300 million tons of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) worldwide. That makes it the fourth biggest food...

    12/18/2007 - 18:43 Nutrition
  • News

    Cholesterol boosts diesel toxicity

    Cholesterol poses a cardiovascular risk once it becomes transformed into an inflammatory building block of artery-clogging plaque. That process, which happens all the time, is triggered by oxidation. A new study finds that breathing nanoscale particles spewed by diesel-fuel combustion—also a common occurrence—may turn on genes that multiply cholesterol's inflammatory and atherosclerotic risks...

    08/08/2007 - 09:53 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • News

    Jay Watch: Birds get sneakier when spies lurk

    In the thief-ridden world of western scrub jays, a bird storing food takes note of any other jay that watches it and later defends the hoard accordingly, says a new study.

    A difference in hiding tactics showed up in lab tests where birds cached some of their favorite food in ice cube trays filled with pellets, says Nicola Clayton of the University of Cambridge in England. When...

    05/17/2006 - 08:35 Animals
  • News

    Dementia off the Menu: Mediterranean diet tied to low Alzheimer's risk

    People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely than their peers to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research on elderly Manhattan residents. The study is the first to link brain benefits to a comprehensive dietary pattern rather than to individual foods or nutrients, say the scientists who performed the research.

    Traditional Mediterranean menus are rich in...

    04/18/2006 - 22:06 Biomedicine
  • News

    Hummingbirds can clock flower refills

    Hummingbirds can keep track of when a particular flower has replenished its nectar and is worth visiting again, say researchers working in the Canadian Rockies.

    That knack may require that hummingbirds have parts of what's called episodic memory, says T. Andrew Hurly of the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. When people recall episodes from their lives, they're remembering what...

    04/11/2006 - 11:54 Animals
  • News

    Leaden streets

    From San Diego, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    When Arlene L. Weiss and her colleagues found that urban house dust tends to contain more lead the closer it is to a frequently opened window, they reasoned that most of the heavy metal arrives from outside. Their new survey now confirms that street grit is the probable source of lead in urban homes and that flaking paint from...

    03/21/2006 - 11:06 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Tapping Tiny Pores: Nanovalves control chemical releases

    Cells readily manufacture the nanoscale valves, pumps, and other gadgets that make life work. For human researchers, fabricating devices in the nanometer range is anything but easy.

    That didn't stop chemist Thoi D. Nguyen and his colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) from building arrays of nanovalves, each made from a single molecule. If used to control minute...

    07/20/2005 - 11:42 Technology
  • News

    Silk and soap settle a century-old flap

    For more than 120 years, the English physicist Lord Rayleigh has had the last word on why flags flap in the breeze. A keen observer who figured out how the scattering of light makes the sky blue, Rayleigh attributed flag flutter to the interplay between deformations of a flag's surface and subtle gusting of the wind. Because the tiniest ripples in the flag and puffs of wind end up amplifying...

    11/15/2004 - 12:22 Physics
  • News

    Lemon-scented products spawn pollutants

    While prepping for holiday guests, many hosts will deploy cleaners and air fresheners that impart a pleasant lemon or pine scent. Though they can mask stale smells, their fragrant ingredients—under certain conditions—may also be a rich source of indoor pollution, a study finds.

    Several years ago, Charles J. Weschler, a chemist at Telcordia Technologies in Red Bank, N.J., stumbled onto...

    10/27/2004 - 13:51 Earth & Environment