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Your search has returned 15 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Troubling Meaty 'Estrogen'

    Women take note. Researchers find that a chemical that forms in overcooked meat, especially charred portions, is a potent mimic of estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. That's anything but appetizing, since studies have linked a higher lifetime cumulative exposure to estrogen in women with an elevated risk of breast cancer.

    Indeed, the new finding offers a "biologically...

    10/17/2007 - 01:38 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Bright Lights, Big Cancer

    In late 1987, Richard G. Stevens, then at Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Wash., typed up a short letter and mailed it to Walter Willett at Harvard Medical School in Boston. The two epidemiologists had met just once, and Stevens wasn't confident that his 209-word note, or the suggestion that it contained about a possible contributor to breast cancer, would inspire any action.

    ...
    01/04/2006 - 14:23 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Warm Ice: Frozen water forms at room temperature

    Zap a layer of water with a strong electric field and, experiments dating back years suggest, some of the liquid freezes, even at comfortable, shirtsleeve temperatures. New experiments indicate that the electric field needn't be so strong. If this result holds, it would indicate that warm ice could appear on a range of confining surfaces, including the minuscule crevices in ordinary rocks....

    08/24/2005 - 12:00 Physics
  • Feature

    Metal Makeover

    Some of the brass directing U.S. Navy research funding appears to have gone off the deep end: The Navy has been sinking serious money into the possibility of building future warships out of glass. Since the late 19th century, shipbuilders have opted for metals, mainly various grades of steel. Yet recently, military agencies have spent tens of millions of dollars on the concept of boats with...

    11/02/2004 - 10:26 Materials
  • News

    Squashed spheres set a record for filling space

    As is clear to anyone who has played with blocks, piles of cubes can occupy every last niche of a space. As for other objects that can't be arranged to fill a space completely, such as cylinders and spheres, scientists have long pondered what their densest packings might be.

    Now, computer simulations indicate an unexpected result: Certain arrangements of modestly deformed spheres...

    06/15/2004 - 11:20 Physics
  • Feature

    Microbial Materials

    Bone. Nerve. Muscle. Horn. Hide. Silk. With ingenious assemblages of atoms and molecules, biology produces fantastic substances that have long inspired scientists to develop the synthetic materials of the modern landscape. Lately, materials scientists have turned to biology's smallest individuals–viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Not only can these microbes be coaxed to produce high-tech...

    06/30/2003 - 13:08 Materials
  • News

    Super Fibers: Nanotubes make tough threads

    The superior mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes have intrigued materials scientists for a decade. But they've struggled to take advantage of the hollow tubes, just nanometers wide, for macroscopic projects.

    Now, researchers have spun the tubes into composite fibers that are tougher than steel, Kevlar, or spider silk. The new fibers appear to be...

    06/11/2003 - 10:23 Materials
  • Feature

    Herbal Lottery

    Echinacea is a commercial success. The dietary supplement–made from the flowers, stems, and leaves of the purple coneflower–has become a popular and lucrative over-the-counter cold remedy. It's also one of the few nutraceuticals–natural products with medicinal reputations–that have substantial scientific evidence to support its purported functions: Various studies suggest that echinacea...

    06/02/2003 - 18:34 Nutrition
  • News

    Answer blows in wind, swirls in soap

    Besides using up energy to move sand dunes, create waves, and otherwise rearrange the scenery, winds exhaust their force on inner processes, too. Collisions between gas molecules, for instance, convert kinetic energy to heat in so-called viscous processes.

    Using a soap film that mimics the atmosphere of Earth or other planets (SN: 8/22/98, p.118), physicists now have measured how...

    04/21/2003 - 20:13 Physics