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Your search has returned 16 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • News

    Leaden streets

    From San Diego, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    When Arlene L. Weiss and her colleagues found that urban house dust tends to contain more lead the closer it is to a frequently opened window, they reasoned that most of the heavy metal arrives from outside. Their new survey now confirms that street grit is the probable source of lead in urban homes and that flaking paint from...

    03/21/2006 - 11:06 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Protozoa Aid Food-Poisoning Germs

    Seemingly innocent microorganisms may have harmful consequences: Ubiquitous waterborne protozoa appear capable of aiding the survival of several types of bacteria responsible for gut-wrenching food poisoning.

    Maria T. Brandl and her colleagues focused on protozoa known as Tetrahymena after finding copious quantities of these renowned bacteria eaters in water from a...

    03/15/2006 - 17:06 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Light Pedaling: Photonic brakes are vital for circuits

    Just as optical fibers have replaced most electrical wires for long-distance telecommunications, light-based circuits may replace electrical ones in applications involving vast flows of data within computers and networks. Now, a team of industrial researchers has taken what may be a crucial step toward such photonic circuitry: They've found a way to dial down the speed of light within...

    11/02/2005 - 12:01 Physics
  • News

    Save the frogs

    A "metaphorical Noah's Ark" is how Claude Gascon describes the action plan drafted last month at an Amphibian Conservation Summit in Washington, D.C. "If implemented, it would hopefully reverse the trend in amphibian extinctions," says Gascon, an officer of the D.C.–based Conservation International and chairman of the World Conservation Union's Global Amphibian Specialist Group.

    ...

    09/28/2005 - 09:46 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • News

    Tapping Tiny Pores: Nanovalves control chemical releases

    Cells readily manufacture the nanoscale valves, pumps, and other gadgets that make life work. For human researchers, fabricating devices in the nanometer range is anything but easy.

    That didn't stop chemist Thoi D. Nguyen and his colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) from building arrays of nanovalves, each made from a single molecule. If used to control minute...

    07/20/2005 - 11:42 Technology
  • News

    Cancer Switch: Good gene is shut off in various malignancies

    A gene called Reprimo is shut down in several cancers but rarely in healthy cells, a new study shows. This finding suggests that the gene's normal action would somehow inhibit these cancers. What's more, Reprimo is stalled in some precancerous growths, indicating that its silencing might occur in the early stages of cancer, says Adi F. Gazdar, a pathologist at the University of Texas-...

    07/13/2005 - 10:18 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    The Case of the Suspicious Hamsters

    Mention Salmonella and most people think of chickens and eggs. Indeed, some 118,000 cases of food poisoning each year in the United States trace to consumption of undercooked eggs contaminated with these bacteria. Scores more people contract the foodborne disease from handling or eating undercooked chicken.

    However, barnyard fowl are far from the only animals that transmit Salmonella....

    05/25/2005 - 16:56 Biomedicine