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Your search has returned 13 articles:
  • Feature

    Back from the Dead?

    In December 1938, Marjorie Courtney-Latimer, curator of a natural history museum in East London, South Africa, went to the docks to look for interesting specimens among the day's catch. What she found one day she later described as "the most beautiful fish I had ever seen ... a pale mauve blue with iridescent silver markings." The discovery sent scientists into a frenzy.

    ...

    11/13/2007 - 11:15 Paleontology
  • News

    Social jet lag: Need a smoke?

    From Munich, at the Euroscience Open Forum meeting

    People who have a hard time waking in the morning because their bodies' internal clocks are out of sync with their sleep schedules are said to have "social jet lag." Researchers in Europe have determined that the phenomenon strongly correlates with smoking.

    Battling one's biological clock can leave people weary in the same way as...

    08/01/2006 - 12:19 Other
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • Food for Thought

    Protozoa Aid Food-Poisoning Germs

    Seemingly innocent microorganisms may have harmful consequences: Ubiquitous waterborne protozoa appear capable of aiding the survival of several types of bacteria responsible for gut-wrenching food poisoning.

    Maria T. Brandl and her colleagues focused on protozoa known as Tetrahymena after finding copious quantities of these renowned bacteria eaters in water from a...

    03/15/2006 - 17:06 Nutrition
  • News

    Light Pedaling: Photonic brakes are vital for circuits

    Just as optical fibers have replaced most electrical wires for long-distance telecommunications, light-based circuits may replace electrical ones in applications involving vast flows of data within computers and networks. Now, a team of industrial researchers has taken what may be a crucial step toward such photonic circuitry: They've found a way to dial down the speed of light within...

    11/02/2005 - 12:01 Physics
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    The Case of the Suspicious Hamsters

    Mention Salmonella and most people think of chickens and eggs. Indeed, some 118,000 cases of food poisoning each year in the United States trace to consumption of undercooked eggs contaminated with these bacteria. Scores more people contract the foodborne disease from handling or eating undercooked chicken.

    However, barnyard fowl are far from the only animals that transmit Salmonella....

    05/25/2005 - 16:56 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    A Carrot Rainbow (with recipe)

    Thanksgiving menus typically include root vegetables. Although some of those vegetables can be slightly exotic—from kohlrabi and rutabaga to ginger—many are familiar standbys, such as carrots. Long, fat, and orange, they make good snacks, add moisture to cakes, and sometimes serve as the nose on a snowman's face.

    Orange was not the carrot's original tint,...

    11/18/2004 - 15:03 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Do Antibodies Pack a Deadly Punch?

    Ask most people what antibodies do, and they'll respond that these immune agents kill bacteria, viruses, and other harmful microbes that seek to infect the body. An immunologist standing nearby would probably correct that answer by pointing out that antibodies don't actually do the dirty work.

    According to mainstream immunology, these Y-shaped proteins merely bind to bits of...

    06/18/2004 - 17:22 Other