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Your search has returned 19 articles:
  • News

    Obesity messes with the brain

    Obesity subtly diminishes memory and other features of thinking and reasoning even among seemingly healthy people, an international team of scientists reports. At least some of these impairments appear reversible through weight loss. Researchers also report one likely mechanism for those cognitive deficits: damage to the wiring that links the brain’s information-processing regions.

    A...

    03/25/2011 - 12:00 Nutrition, Body & Brain
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Be Good to Your Gums, Bite Into Whole Grains (with recipe)

    After years of whole grains being relegated to niche markets and vegetarian recipes, these fiber-based foods have enjoyed a surge in popularity. Propelling this move has been the publication of study after study showing the benefits of whole-grain foods such as oatmeal, brown rice, muesli, and millet. These benefits range from heart health and weight loss to better blood-sugar control.

    ...
    06/21/2006 - 16:22 Nutrition
  • News

    Chimps lead way to HIV birthplace

    The global AIDS epidemic originated in chimpanzees living in southeastern Cameroon, a viral analysis confirms.

    An international team of scientists analyzed 599 fecal specimens from 10 forest sites in Cameroon and found evidence of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the direct precursor of the AIDS virus, HIV-1.

    In 1999, Beatrice Hahn of the University of Alabama at Birmingham...

    06/06/2006 - 18:27
  • News

    Leaden streets

    From San Diego, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    When Arlene L. Weiss and her colleagues found that urban house dust tends to contain more lead the closer it is to a frequently opened window, they reasoned that most of the heavy metal arrives from outside. Their new survey now confirms that street grit is the probable source of lead in urban homes and that flaking paint from...

    03/21/2006 - 11:06 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • News

    Swift Lift: Birds may get a rise out of swirling air

    Birds do it, and bees do it. But until recently, scientists thought the birds and bees did it in different ways.

    We're talking about flying, of course. Researchers have known for years that insects fly thanks to whirlpools of air called leading-edge vortices that form above their flapping wings (SN: 6/19/99, p. 390). Those low-pressure swirls create suction that pulls the...

    12/08/2004 - 14:44 Physics
  • News

    Lemon-scented products spawn pollutants

    While prepping for holiday guests, many hosts will deploy cleaners and air fresheners that impart a pleasant lemon or pine scent. Though they can mask stale smells, their fragrant ingredients—under certain conditions—may also be a rich source of indoor pollution, a study finds.

    Several years ago, Charles J. Weschler, a chemist at Telcordia Technologies in Red Bank, N.J., stumbled onto...

    10/27/2004 - 13:51 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Lowering lilies on the tree of life

    New genetic analyses are shaking the lowest living branch on the family tree of flowering plants. The question is: Should we move water lilies down to that ancient lineage?

    Last summer, presentations at the International Botanical Congress in St. Louis redrew the notoriously puzzling base of the tree. On the lowest branch that still has a living sprout, they placed a living...

    08/10/2004 - 17:51 Plants