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Your search has returned 16 articles:
  • News

    Slimming on oolong

    Without skimping on portions, rats eating diets including oolong tea gain less weight than those dining teafree, a new study finds. The tea apparently impairs the body's ability to absorb fat.

    The finding supports a weight-control strategy—oolong consumption—advocated by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, note Lauren E. Budd and her colleagues at the University of California...

    05/15/2007 - 15:09 Nutrition
  • News

    Mafia Cowbirds: Do they muscle birds that don't play ball?

    Cowbirds in Illinois that sneak their eggs into other birds' nests retaliate violently if their scam gets foiled, researchers say.

    The brown-headed cowbirds of North America outsource nest building and chick raising. Female cowbirds dart into other birds' nests, quickly lay eggs, and rush away. The nest owners are left to care for big, demanding cowbird chicks.

    ...
    03/07/2007 - 11:56 Animals
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Light Pedaling: Photonic brakes are vital for circuits

    Just as optical fibers have replaced most electrical wires for long-distance telecommunications, light-based circuits may replace electrical ones in applications involving vast flows of data within computers and networks. Now, a team of industrial researchers has taken what may be a crucial step toward such photonic circuitry: They've found a way to dial down the speed of light within...

    11/02/2005 - 12:01 Physics
  • Feature

    A Galling Business

    As a consultant to the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Jill Robinson walked onto her first bear farm 12 years ago. At this facility in southern China, she found each bear standing not on a solid floor but on bars in a cage too small for the animal to take even one step. Although the Asiatic black bear is normally a solitary and clean animal, these cages were crowded together in...

    10/06/2005 - 12:25 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • News

    Echinacea Disappoints: There's still no cure for the common cold

    A folk remedy touted as a cold treatment has failed its most recent—and possibly most exacting—test. Volunteers exposed to a cold virus and given the herbal supplement echinacea fared no better than did virus-exposed participants who received an inert substance, researchers report in the July 28 New England Journal of Medicine.

    The U.S. study is the third in 3 years in which echinacea...

    07/27/2005 - 10:25 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    To Fight Cataracts, It's Fish Yea, Mayo Nay

    Bad news for mayonnaise lovers. A pair of new studies from a Boston research team links this condiment, as well as certain vegetable oils, to an elevated risk of age-related cataracts. One of those studies, however, also suggests that oily fish, the type with dark flesh, hold cataracts at bay.

    Age-related cataracts are the leading cause of blindness. Indeed, cataract...

    05/11/2005 - 21:20 Nutrition