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Your search has returned 14 articles:
  • Feature

    Restoring Scents

    Betty (not her real name) remembers the day 9 years ago when she fully experienced an orange. As she split the fruit's skin, citrus scents sprayed into the air and the 51-year-old woman experienced a sensory epiphany: "Whoa! This is an orange. My God, this is what an orange smells like."

    Even now, she says, recalling that day "makes me tear up because that orange...

    07/02/2007 - 11:49 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    New Estimates of the Shark-Fin Trade

    Immense numbers of sharks each year are slaughtered for their fins—not meat, just their fins. This harvest helps feed a growing appetite throughout Asia for a popular soup, one with snob appeal comparable to that of caviar. Indeed, a single bowl of shark-fin soup can cost $100 in a high-end Hong Kong restaurant.

    The key ingredient of shark-fin soup is...

    11/01/2006 - 13:22 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Fish as Farmers: Reef residents tend an algal crop

    A damselfish cultivates underwater gardens of an algal species that researchers haven't found growing on its own.

    The special alga could be the fishy version of people's domesticated crops, says Hiroki Hata of Kyoto University in Japan. Growth tests of the alga, surveys of its distribution, and genetic analyses support that idea, he and Makoto Kato say in an upcoming Biology...

    08/09/2006 - 12:05 Ecology
  • News

    Champion of strength is forged in mighty anvil

    A newly created form of carbon has captured the crown of world's strongest known material. A team of researchers in Germany and France made the new material using a specialized, multijawed anvil that simultaneously squeezed and heated a powder of all-carbon molecules known as buckyballs.

    At 200,000 times atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 2,500 kelvins, the powder...

    09/13/2005 - 12:18 Physics
  • Feature

    Extreme Impersonations

    Extreme physical conditions have a way of bringing out the strangest behaviors that nature can muster. Just ask physicist John E. Thomas. Two years ago, he and his colleagues at Duke University in Durham, N.C., were working with intense lasers in a high-vacuum chamber at temperatures next to absolute zero. They were manipulating tiny clouds of lithium gas. When the scientists turned off the...

    09/11/2004 - 17:58 Physics
  • News

    New pass at neutrino mass

    The first of a new breed of experiments on neutrinos has detected an energy pattern consistent with earlier hints that those subatomic particles have mass. However, the prevailing theory of particle physics assumes no mass for the three types of neutrinos—electron, muon, or tau neutrinos.

    Since 1998, experimenters have found that neutrinos can change types—a process possible only if...

    06/20/2004 - 16:35 Physics
  • News

    Green tea takes on poison

    Dioxin, a carcinogenic by-product of many combustion processes, is ubiquitous throughout the environment, including in the food people eat. One way to protect against this contaminant could rely on natural plant compounds that short-circuit dioxin's toxicity. A new study finds that green tea contains several such agents and suggests that other dietary staples might offer protection against...

    06/07/2004 - 21:20 Nutrition
  • News

    Quantum link connects light, ions

    Instantly teleporting people and objects from one planet to another is a staple of science fiction. Now, physicists at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have taken a promising step toward teleporting at least some traits from atom to atom.

    The new technique relies on a well-known but still mysterious phenomenon called entanglement, in which specific quantum traits of elementary...

    03/21/2004 - 20:35 Physics
  • Feature

    The Body Electric

    As anyone who has ever recited the Pledge of Allegiance will attest, having your heart in the right place means having it on your left side. Despite the outward symmetry of the human body, left-right differences abound beneath everyone's skin. The majority of the heart's bulk usually sits on the body's left side, although the organ's aorta loops to the right. The right lung has three lobes,...

    09/14/2003 - 19:36 Other
  • News

    Killer sex, literally

    Videotapes of yellow garden spiders show that if a female doesn't murder her mate, he'll expire during sex anyway.

    "As far as we know, it's the first time anyone has shown males spontaneously dying during copulation," says Daphne J. Fairbairn of the University of California, Riverside. She's not talking about the odd heart attack among romancing fellows. Among males of the yellow...

    07/08/2003 - 18:07 Animals