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Your search has returned 17 articles:
  • Feature

    Fractal or Fake?

    Jackson Pollock couldn't possibly have been thinking of fractals when he started flinging and dripping paint from a stick onto canvas. After all, mathematicians didn't develop the idea of a fractal until a couple of decades later. But if one physicist is right, Pollock ended up painting fractals anyway. And that mathematical quality may explain why Pollock's seemingly chaotic streams of paint...

    02/20/2007 - 10:14 Humans & Society
  • Food for Thought

    New Estimates of the Shark-Fin Trade

    Immense numbers of sharks each year are slaughtered for their fins—not meat, just their fins. This harvest helps feed a growing appetite throughout Asia for a popular soup, one with snob appeal comparable to that of caviar. Indeed, a single bowl of shark-fin soup can cost $100 in a high-end Hong Kong restaurant.

    The key ingredient of shark-fin soup is...

    11/01/2006 - 13:22 Earth & Environment
  • Letters to the Editor

    Letters from the January 7, 2006, issue of Science News

    Death in the Americas

    I was wondering if researchers have given any thought to the idea that in the same way that disease devastated human populations after the European discovery of the Americas, perhaps disease was a contributing factor in the demise of much of the fauna of the Western Hemisphere ("Caribbean Extinctions: Climate change probably wasn't the culprit," SN: 10/29/05, p. 275)....

    01/04/2006 - 12:38 Humans & Society
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Champion of strength is forged in mighty anvil

    A newly created form of carbon has captured the crown of world's strongest known material. A team of researchers in Germany and France made the new material using a specialized, multijawed anvil that simultaneously squeezed and heated a powder of all-carbon molecules known as buckyballs.

    At 200,000 times atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 2,500 kelvins, the powder...

    09/13/2005 - 12:18 Physics
  • Feature

    Morphing Memory

    Anyone who purchases an electronic camera, cell phone, voice recorder, travel disk, or PDA, typically brings home a stick, card, or some other medium containing a chip ready to store information via a technology known as flash memory. Last year, consumers worldwide bought almost $12 billion worth of flash products, which depend on electrons to store data. The semiconductor industry expects...

    05/31/2005 - 21:29 Technology
  • Feature

    Starting from Square One

    Quarks are the smaller-than-a-proton particles without which there would be no stars, dogs, or breakfast burritos. In 1986, after a dozen frustrating years of trying to find ways of using computers to calculate properties of quark-containing entities such as protons and neutrons, Kenneth G. Wilson threw in the towel at a physics meeting. Wilson, who had already won a Nobel prize for previous...

    08/03/2004 - 10:16 Physics
  • News

    Flexible E-Paper: Plastic circuits drive paperlike displays

    In a major step toward electronic paper that works like a computer monitor yet feels and behaves like a page of a book, researchers in the Netherlands have made electronic-ink displays on flexible plastic sheets.

    A U.S. company developed the electronic ink over the past several years. "Just like your newspaper, you can see it in bright light, dim light, or from all angles...

    01/28/2004 - 11:47 Materials
  • Feature

    Human, Mouse, Rat . . . What's Next?

    What if some explorers of a remote region in the world stumbled across a lost colony whose members are immune to major human illnesses such as AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, malaria, and even cancer? Imagine the rush by biomedical researchers to tease out the secrets behind the good fortune of such beings.

    The colony's advantage might stem from habits of nutrition, or lifestyle—maybe a...

    01/16/2004 - 17:03 Other
  • News

    The Daily Flicks: Morphing ink may bring video to newspapers

    Imagine opening the newspaper and seeing a full-color, video clip of a battle or sports match. That's the sort of vision that drives developers of electronic paper. Even though a black-and-white version that can display static images remains in development, two new approaches offer the prospects of video and bright color.

    Electronic paper is a display technology akin to...

    09/24/2003 - 11:30 Technology