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Your search has returned 65 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Another Way Men and Women Differ

    At least until menopause, women face a lower risk than men do of artery-clogging heart disease. Michigan scientists now turn up one potential reason: before menopause, one of the avenues for clearing meal-derived fats from the blood operates better in women than in men of the same age. This makes the fat less available to the plaque-forming cells in women's arterial walls.

    ...

    08/30/2006 - 16:24 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Be Good to Your Gums, Bite Into Whole Grains (with recipe)

    After years of whole grains being relegated to niche markets and vegetarian recipes, these fiber-based foods have enjoyed a surge in popularity. Propelling this move has been the publication of study after study showing the benefits of whole-grain foods such as oatmeal, brown rice, muesli, and millet. These benefits range from heart health and weight loss to better blood-sugar control.

    ...
    06/21/2006 - 16:22 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Amphibious Ancestors

    Imagine a scale-covered fish that uses fleshy limbs that end in fins to haul itself out of the water. Its mosaic of body features also includes sturdy ribs, the first vertebrate neck, and both gills and lungs. Paleontologists recently unearthed fossils of such a creature, which met their expectations for a proposed missing link between fish and the earliest land vertebrates. These relics...

    06/13/2006 - 10:05 Paleontology
  • Food for Thought

    Meat Poses Exaggerated Cancer Risk for Some People

    Last year, the federal government's National Toxicology Program confirmed what many researchers had long been reporting: The heterocyclic amines that form in overcooked meat can trigger colon cancer in animals and probably do the same in people. Now, researchers studying mice have identified a gene that is needed to keep individual animals from becoming especially vulnerable to these...

    03/22/2006 - 16:26 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Fooling the Satiety Meter (with recipe)

    Want to lose weight without counting calories? A new study finds that the easiest strategy might be reducing a meal's energy density—calories per ounce of food. When volunteers were offered such density-diminished meals, they rated the fare as filling—and as palatable—as they had full-calorie versions of the same foods.

    Smaller portions also curbed how much someone...

    02/16/2006 - 15:33 Nutrition
  • News

    Feminized cod on the high seas

    From Baltimore, at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

    Male cod in the open ocean are producing vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein ordinarily made only by females.

    Vitellogenin "is a highly specific indicator of a fish's exposure to estrogens"—female sex hormones—as well as to pollutants that mimic them, notes Alexander P. Scott of the Centre for...

    12/04/2005 - 16:01 Ecology
  • News

    Nobel prizes: The power of original thinking

    Physiology or Medicine

    Two Australian scientists who showed that bacteria can cause stomach ulcers have won the 2005 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

    The researchers made their discovery 23 years ago, at a time when ulcers were thought to result mainly from excess stomach acid brought on by stress and spicy food. In 1979, J. Robin Warren, a pathologist at the Royal Perth...

    10/05/2005 - 10:52 Humans & Society
  • News

    Head-to-Head Comparison: Coils top clips in brain-aneurysm treatment

    Insertion of a tiny metal coil into a bleeding aneurysm in the brain appears safer in the long run for some patients than a more-established treatment that requires brain surgery, researchers find.

    A brain aneurysm—an abnormal bulge in a weakened blood vessel—is a tragedy in waiting. Aneurysms sometimes rupture, and the leaking blood can cause brain damage ending in disability or...

    09/14/2005 - 10:55 Biomedicine