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Your search has returned 19 articles:
  • News

    Obesity messes with the brain

    Obesity subtly diminishes memory and other features of thinking and reasoning even among seemingly healthy people, an international team of scientists reports. At least some of these impairments appear reversible through weight loss. Researchers also report one likely mechanism for those cognitive deficits: damage to the wiring that links the brain’s information-processing regions.

    A...

    03/25/2011 - 12:00 Nutrition, Body & Brain
  • News

    Dribble Quibble: Experiments find that new basketball gets slick

    A dispute in professional basketball about a new ball has bounced its way into a physics lab. A study launched last month at the University of Texas at Arlington compares a controversial plastic ball introduced in preseason games this summer by the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the previous standard—a leather-covered ball. The official basketball season, the first in which the...

    11/01/2006 - 09:21 Materials
  • News

    Macho Moms: Perchlorate pollutant masculinizes fish

    Known largely as a component of rocket fuel, perchlorate is a pollutant that often turns up in soil and water. In dozens of studies, it has perturbed thyroid-hormone concentrations, which can affect growth and neurological development. Data from fish now indicate that perchlorate can also disrupt sexual development.

    Some of the changes were so dramatic that scientists initially...

    08/09/2006 - 10:53 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Fruits and Veggies Limit Inflammatory Protein (with recipe)

    Over the past few years, many studies have linked an increased risk of debilitating illness—such as heart disease or diabetes—with chronically elevated blood concentrations of a protein typically associated with inflammation. In many cases, people with the indicated illnesses didn't even have a particularly level of inflammation. The good news: A new trial finds that eating plenty of fruits...

    12/01/2005 - 14:38 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Star Wars Goes Organic

    M&M chocolate-candy commercials are among the more entertaining on television. In the latest one, a plain and a peanut M&M character meet with Darth Vader of Star Wars. After a little muscular persuasion by Darth, the M&M guys announce they'll join "the dark side."

    M&M/Mars calls this its first installment in "Chocolate M-pire," an ad...

    05/19/2005 - 15:31 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Trimming with Tea

    Here's a new diet drink to help people shed pounds: oolong tea enriched with some of the antioxidant compounds that naturally occur in green tea. Men who drank this hybrid brew during a 3-month study in Japan lost 1.1 more kilograms in weight than did men drinking conventional oolong tea—with no other difference in their respective diets or exercise.

    The hybrid tea also...

    02/09/2005 - 13:29 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Calculating Swarms

    The frenetic scurrying of ants around a nest may seem like much ado about nothing. There's method in their madness, however.

    All this activity adds up to ingenious strategies for collectively working out the shortest path to a food source, combining forces to move a large, unwieldy object, and performing other functions crucial to an ant colony's well-being.

    ...

    06/18/2004 - 17:11 Computing
  • Feature

    Air Sickness

    On Oct. 26, 1948, a temperature inversion laid a blanket of cold, stagnant air over Donora, Pa., a tiny mill town on the Monongahela River. Over the next 5 days, the buildup of pollution cloaked the sun, sometimes restricting vision to just a few feet. Twenty people died outright and 50 more perished within a month from lingering health damage, says consulting epidemiologist Devra Davis, a...

    07/28/2003 - 12:04 Earth & Environment
  • Math Trek

    Mathematical Art on Display

    The term "mathematical art" usually conjures up just one name–that of Dutch graphic artist M. C. Escher (1898–1972). Many people are familiar with Escher's endless staircases, hyperbolic tilings, Möbius ants, intricate tessellations, and other creations. They may also be aware of the intertwining of mathematics and art during the Renaissance, with the development of perspective...

    04/02/2003 - 10:20 Numbers
  • Feature

    When Drinking Helps

    Downing a cocktail or other alcoholic drink at least three to four times a week appears to substantially cut a man's risk of heart attack, Boston-area researchers reported in early January. Less than a week later, a U.S.-Canadian team of epidemiologists focusing on African Americans announced it had found no clear benefit to people drinking the same amount of alcohol per week. These reports...

    03/04/2003 - 12:35 Biomedicine