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E.g., 11/18/2017
E.g., 11/18/2017
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  • photograph of miniature crime scene by Frances Glessner Lee
Your search has returned 89 articles:
  • Feature

    Wanted: Crime-solving bacteria and body odor

    Forensic biologist Silvana Tridico was puzzled by pubic hair.

    Specifically, pubic hair samples donated by two volunteers.

    She had just finished analyzing the bacteria stuck to the hair of seven people. If each hair sample carried unique mixes of bacteria, Tridico reasoned, investigators might have a new tool to help identify crime suspects. Hair bacteria, like fingerprints, could...

    08/26/2015 - 14:32 Chemistry, Microbiology, Technology
  • Feature

    The Power of D

    A nutritional supplement that is free of charge, offers a wide range of health benefits and poses little risk sounds like fodder for a late-night TV commercial. But proponents of vitamin D are increasingly convinced that the sunshine vitamin delivers the goods, no strings attached.

    It offers a safe route to better health, these advocates say, by...

    07/01/2011 - 12:45 Body & Brain
  • Feature

    Big Fishing Yields Small Fish

    Sharks, billfish, cod, tuna and other fish-eating fish — the sea’s equivalents to lions on the Serengeti — dominated the marine world as recently as four decades ago. They culled sick, lame and old animals and kept populations of marine herbivores in check, preventing marine analogs of antelopes from overgrazing their environment.

    But the reign of large predators now...

    03/25/2011 - 11:51
  • Feature

    Lettuce Liability

    Little more than a year ago, supermarkets from coast to coast stripped fresh spinach from produce aisles as a food-poisoning outbreak swept the nation. From mid-August through September 2006, virulent bacterial infections sickened at least 204 spinach consumers. Five died and 30 others suffered acute kidney failure.

    Among more than 3,500 genetically unique...

    12/03/2007 - 19:41 Agriculture
  • News

    Salmonella seeks sweets

    Salmonella enterica, a major food-poisoning germ, can enter the tissues of fresh lettuce where no amount of surface washing will evict it. The scientists who reported that finding earlier this year now think that they've gotten to the root of the issue.

    To model salmonella soil contamination from livestock wastes, the researchers seeded sterile manure with one of three toxic strains of...

    11/07/2007 - 10:28 Nutrition
  • News

    Crystal matchmaker

    Having evolved from mathematical playthings to curiosities of physics, the structures known as quasicrystals could become great tools for the electronics industry.

    Like crystals, quasicrystals are built from units of atoms arranged in an orderly fashion. But, unlike crystals, quasicrystals have building blocks that interlock in a pattern that doesn't repeat at regular intervals (SN: 10/...

    07/18/2007 - 12:34 Materials
  • Food for Thought

    Now This Is Depressing . . .

    People who increased their fish consumption to brighten their outlook on life may want to consider alternative strategies. A new review of published studies on the effects of long-chain omega-3 fats—the type found in fish oils—finds "little support" that they "improve depressed mood." However, that's no reason to give up eating fish. Their fats have been linked to a host of health benefits,...

    12/20/2006 - 16:59 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Dashing Rogues

    In February 1933, the Navy tanker USS Ramapo was steaming its way from the Philippines to San Diego in the midst of an exceptionally strong storm. The 146-meter-long ship was buffeted by near-hurricane–force winds. Early on the morning of Feb. 7, a wave far larger than the others surrounding the ship overtook the Ramapo from behind.

    As the stern of the ship dropped...

    11/13/2006 - 09:18 Earth
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Another Way Men and Women Differ

    At least until menopause, women face a lower risk than men do of artery-clogging heart disease. Michigan scientists now turn up one potential reason: before menopause, one of the avenues for clearing meal-derived fats from the blood operates better in women than in men of the same age. This makes the fat less available to the plaque-forming cells in women's arterial walls.

    ...

    08/30/2006 - 16:24 Nutrition