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Your search has returned 35 articles:
  • Feature

    The Power of D

    A nutritional supplement that is free of charge, offers a wide range of health benefits and poses little risk sounds like fodder for a late-night TV commercial. But proponents of vitamin D are increasingly convinced that the sunshine vitamin delivers the goods, no strings attached.

    It offers a safe route to better health,...

    07/01/2011 - 12:45 Body & Brain
  • News

    Salmonella seeks sweets

    Salmonella enterica, a major food-poisoning germ, can enter the tissues of fresh lettuce where no amount of surface washing will evict it. The scientists who reported that finding earlier this year now think that they've gotten to the root of the issue.

    To model salmonella soil contamination from livestock wastes, the researchers seeded sterile manure with one of three toxic strains of...

    11/07/2007 - 10:28 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Chocolate Constituent Bests Fluoride

    "Chocolate Toothpaste? Extract of Tasty Treat Could Fight Tooth Decay."

    That's how Tulane University's news office provocatively titled a press release it issued last week. Sound sweet? Unfortunately, it's anything but. The extract, theobromine, is a bitter constituent of a number of plants, including the beans used to make chocolate. A chemical cousin to caffeine...

    05/22/2007 - 17:14 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Prescription Strength Chocolate, Revisited

    For roughly a decade, science-savvy chocolate consumers have taken comfort from a string of studies suggesting that their sweet and usually high-fat vice has a potential up side. The most reassuring news was that the antioxidant flavonoids abundant in dark chocolate appear to reduce blood pressure and perhaps protect people from dangerous blood clots.

    At the Cocoa Symposium...

    02/23/2006 - 18:52 Nutrition
  • News

    Feds pull approval of poultry antibiotic

    The Food and Drug Administration is about to prohibit poultry farmers from treating chickens and turkeys with the antibiotic enrofloxacin. Use of the antibiotic, whose trade name is Baytril, is leading to the emergence of microbes in the birds' meat that resist several antibiotics used to treat food poisoning in people, the agency says.

    On the market for 9 years, the drug has become...

    08/09/2005 - 11:14 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Cardiovascular Showdown—Chocolate vs. Coffee

    Chocolate and coffee seem to go together perfectly. Think of a double-shot mocha at the corner coffee shop. Yet, the two ingredients appear to have opposite effects on a person's arteries, according to two new studies. Chocolate is good for them, whereas coffee—or at least its caffeine—does damage.

    Two teams of cardiologists from Greece presented the findings...

    05/27/2004 - 18:45 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Gardens

    Soils in many cities of the United States carry a poisonous legacy: heavy concentrations of lead. The metal was deposited for years as fallout from flaking leaded house paint and the emissions of cars burning leaded gasoline. Recognizing the threat posed by tainted soil, environmental scientists have warned that growing edible plants in soils near streets or within several feet of homes and...

    12/04/2003 - 17:26 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    As If You Needed Another Reason to Eat Strawberries (with recipe)

    Whether draped atop shortcake, cooked with rhubarb and slathered over vanilla ice cream, or downed in the garden just after picking, strawberries are one of summer's delights. Now, scientists at Cornell University find that this fragile fruit not only tastes great and contains vitamins but also may offer surprisingly potent benefits in the body's fight against cancer and heart disease.

    ...
    10/15/2003 - 13:16 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Wash Those Hands!

    When physicians talk about food poisoning, they're not usually referring to the effects of natural toxins made by plants or animals. But some foods do carry that danger. For instance, potatoes can develop pest-deterring agents in and just under their skins that can sicken or, rarely, kill a person. And certain fish — such as the infamous puffer — produce chemicals that have done in more than...

    10/08/2003 - 13:10 Technology
  • Food for Thought

    Cranberry Juice—A Cocktail for the Heart

    Chemist Joe Vinson has a passion for foods and the potentially beneficial antioxidants they bring to the dinner table.

    Three years ago, for instance, he reported data showing that molecule for molecule, the antioxidants in chocolate exceed the potency of vitamin C. Now he finds another powerful stash of these protective compounds in cranberries and their juice. Moreover, the...

    03/27/2003 - 11:10 Nutrition