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Your search has returned 49 articles:
  • Feature

    The Power of D

    A nutritional supplement that is free of charge, offers a wide range of health benefits and poses little risk sounds like fodder for a late-night TV commercial. But proponents of vitamin D are increasingly convinced that the sunshine vitamin delivers the goods, no strings attached.

    It offers a safe route to better health, these advocates say, by...

    07/01/2011 - 12:45 Body & Brain
  • Science & the Public

    PCBs hike blood pressure

    No one would choose to eat polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs — yet we unwittingly do. And a new study finds that the cost of their pervasive contamination of our food supply can be high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease.

    PCBs comprise a family of 209 related, colorless and oily compounds. Discovered more than a century ago, they quickly won widespread adoption as...

    11/17/2009 - 17:43 Biomedicine, Earth & Environment, Humans & Society
  • Food for Thought

    Now This Is Depressing . . .

    People who increased their fish consumption to brighten their outlook on life may want to consider alternative strategies. A new review of published studies on the effects of long-chain omega-3 fats—the type found in fish oils—finds "little support" that they "improve depressed mood." However, that's no reason to give up eating fish. Their fats have been linked to a host of health benefits,...

    12/20/2006 - 16:59 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Birds Don't Have to Be So Hot

    Last week, Iowa State University issued a news release about how long it takes to cook a turkey if you place it into the oven frozen. The answer: 5.5 hours for a 13- to 15-pound bird cooked in a 325°F oven.

    However, what really caught my attention was something a little lower in the release—that the U.S. Department of Agriculture had issued a statement earlier this year...

    11/20/2006 - 14:15 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Dashing Rogues

    In February 1933, the Navy tanker USS Ramapo was steaming its way from the Philippines to San Diego in the midst of an exceptionally strong storm. The 146-meter-long ship was buffeted by near-hurricane–force winds. Early on the morning of Feb. 7, a wave far larger than the others surrounding the ship overtook the Ramapo from behind.

    As the stern of the ship dropped...

    11/13/2006 - 09:18 Earth
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    In Pixels and in Health

    Moment by moment, a movie captures the action as a group of immune cells scrambles to counter an invasion of tuberculosis bacteria. Rushing to the site of infected lung tissue, the cells build a complex sphere of active immune cells, dead immune cells, lung tissue, and trapped bacteria. Remarkably, no lung tissue or bacterium was harmed in the making of this film.

    Instead...

    01/17/2006 - 12:03 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    How 'Green' Is Home Cooking?

    Which is better for the environment: a meal cooked from scratch at home or a packaged frozen or freeze-dried meal cooked up in distant industrial kitchens and trucked to supermarkets? Most consumers would guess the former, notes environmental engineer Ulf Sonesson. Even many food scientists would vote for home cooking as the greener option, he says.

    However, those guesses...

    07/26/2005 - 15:30 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents on...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Botany under the Mistletoe

    A holiday merrymaker loitering under the mistletoe may not be thinking much about parasitic plants. That's a loss, because the world's mistletologists are making wondrous findings about the more than 1,300 species they study.

    Some of the plants have flowers with trick openings. Some shoot their seeds farther than most watermelon spitters can spout. Some...

    11/22/2004 - 18:08 Plants