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Your search has returned 18 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Troubling Meaty 'Estrogen'

    Women take note. Researchers find that a chemical that forms in overcooked meat, especially charred portions, is a potent mimic of estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. That's anything but appetizing, since studies have linked a higher lifetime cumulative exposure to estrogen in women with an elevated risk of breast cancer.

    Indeed, the new finding offers a "biologically...

    10/17/2007 - 01:38 Nutrition
  • News

    No-stick chemicals can mimic estrogen

    From Montreal, at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

    Preliminary data indicate that some of the compounds used to keep water from soaking into raincoats, grease from sopping through microwave-popcorn bags, and foods from sticking to cookware have another notable attribute: They can act like estrogen, the primary female-sex hormone.

    Recent studies...

    11/28/2006 - 16:42 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Saving Sturgeon

    On a fine spring day alongside a Wisconsin river, several biologists wrestle a muscular, 120-pound fish onto her back and straddle her. The moves wouldn't be out of place in a rodeo. As the team restrains her, one member massages her swollen belly, working her eggs out of a release vent and into a plastic pail. The late-April scene occurs as, throughout the northern Midwest, water...

    02/27/2006 - 12:50 Ecology
  • News

    Urban fish show perturbed spawning cycle

    From Baltimore, at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

    Sediment-dwelling English sole living in and around Seattle's urban waterfront exhibit spawning anomalies that might compromise their reproductive success, a team of aquatic biologists finds. The changes indicate chronic exposure to environmental contaminants that mimic the animals' own estrogen, the...

    12/04/2005 - 17:03 Other
  • News

    Salmon puzzle: Why did males turn female?

    Every year, rivers of chinook—the Pacific's largest salmon—leave the ocean for an upstream trek into the streams of their birth. When these 4-to-6-year-olds reach home, they spawn and die. Surprisingly, a new study finds, most of the moms in one of Washington State's major spawning populations appear to have begun their lives as males.

    "This is clearly abnormal," notes James J....

    11/22/2004 - 16:50 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    When to Change Sex

    Hollywood does sensationalize, so the unnatural sex-role behavior in last summer's cartoon hit Finding Nemo shouldn't have surprised fish biologists. In the movie, a male clownfish loses his mate and most of their offspring in an attack on their home within an anemone, but—here's the extraordinary part—that older male fish continues to act as a father, and the surviving youngster behaves as a...

    01/11/2004 - 13:59 Other
  • News

    Slowing Puberty? Pesticide may hinder development in boys

    Chronic exposure to a widely used pesticide may delay sexual maturity in boys, according to a new study in India.

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine used around the world to protect squash, melons, strawberries, and other produce. A 2001 report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimated that 1.4 million pounds of the pesticide are used annually on U.S. crops. It's also the third...

    12/10/2003 - 11:11 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Extracting Estrogens: Modern treatment plants strip hormone from sewage

    Reproductive hormones, both natural and the synthetic ones in contraceptive drugs, sometimes survive sewage treatment and turn up in the environment where they can affect wildlife. Modern sewage-treatment facilities, about half of those used in Europe, break down these sex hormones more effectively than older plants do.

    A new study shows why: Only the modern, multiple-chamber treatment...

    07/30/2003 - 09:28 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    New Concerns about Phthalates

    Phthalates. Difficult to spell and harder to sound out, this class of compounds would be forgettable if the name didn't keep popping up in debates over the safety of intravenous-blood bags, food packaging, and children's toys.

    Phthalates have become ubiquitous in modern society. Some of these oily substances find use as solvents, but most serve as...

    06/16/2003 - 12:59 Earth & Environment