Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 02/26/2017
E.g., 02/26/2017
Your search has returned 4 images:
  • warped spacetime
  • Hubble space telescope in space
Your search has returned 573 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    Cone snails wander in circles, lose focus with boosted CO2

    Cone snails are normally stealthy hunters, but they become clumsy and unfocused in water with increased levels of carbon dioxide.

    Oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. As atmospheric CO2 levels rise, those in the oceans do too, changing the chemistry of the seawater.

    Cone snails (Conus marmoreus) that spent several weeks in water dosed to simulate CO2 levels expected at the turn...

    02/02/2017 - 17:00 Oceans, Climate, Animals
  • Feature

    Einstein's genius changed science's perception of gravity

    Albert Einstein opened humankind’s eyes to the universe.

    Before Einstein, space seemed featureless and changeless, as Isaac Newton had defined it two centuries earlier. And time, Newton declared, flowed at its own pace, oblivious to the clocks that measured it. But Einstein looked at space and time and saw a single dynamic stage — spacetime — on which matter and energy strutted,...

    10/04/2015 - 05:30 Astronomy, Physics, History of Science
  • Feature

    Celebrating 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

    View slideshow • View video

    On a chilly Saturday evening in March, unfazed by more than 6 inches of new snow, hundreds of people crowded into Shriver Hall at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore to hear the East Coast premiere of “Cosmic Dust,” an orchestral piece set to images of deep space. A trumpet fanfare conveyed the immense power of an exploding star; a cascade from the violins...

    04/07/2015 - 14:15 Astronomy
  • Science Visualized

    A coast-to-coast picture of America's cacophony of sounds

    An ambitious National Park Service project exploits computer algorithms to predict the loudness of a typical summer day from coast to coast. The project’s newest map (above, with yellow representing the loudest noise) includes natural sounds, but it’s the human-made features that jump out.

    The eastern half of the United States is louder than the West, according to the map, released...

    02/16/2015 - 12:12 Sustainability, Conservation
  • Earth in Action

    When an asteroid heads for Earth, it’s time to reconsider those doomsday plans

    Chicken Little is right. The sky is falling.

    The million-plus people living in Chelyabinsk, Russia, got that message on February 15, when a space rock some 17 meters across detonated over their homes. People rushed to the windows in wonderment as a blaze of light arced through the sky; seconds later many of them got a face full of glass shards. It was the most damaging cosmic collision...

    03/07/2013 - 09:15 Atom & Cosmos
  • Column

    Alexandra Witze, Earth in action

    SN Prime | March 4, 2013 | Vol. 3, No. 9

    Chicken Little is right. The sky is falling.

    The million-plus people living in Chelyabinsk, Russia, got that message on February 15, when a space rock some 17 meters across detonated over their homes. People rushed to the windows in wonderment as a blaze of light arced through the sky; seconds later many of them got a face full of glass...

    03/04/2013 - 11:29
  • News

    Time travel nixed in metamaterial world

    Unable to study the Big Bang in person, physicists have now simulated it in a bit of plastic and metal.

    This desktop model tries to re-create the forward movement of time that drives history ever onward. In this experiment, as in many others before, time travel is impossible.

    “It’s a toy representation of what actually happens in our universe,” says Igor Smolyaninov, a...

    04/15/2011 - 14:42 Matter & Energy, Atom & Cosmos
  • Science & the Public

    Record ‘Arctic’ ozone minimum expands beyond Arctic

    In mid-March, our online story about the thinning of stratospheric ozone over the Arctic noted that conditions appeared primed for regional ozone losses to post an all-time record. On April 5, World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Michel Jarraud announced that Arctic ozone had indeed suffered an unprecedented thinning.Ozone losses this year “still don’t compare to what occurs in...

    04/05/2011 - 12:20 Humans & Society, Chemistry, Earth & Environment, Earth, Climate
  • News

    Mice robbed of darkness fatten up

    When it comes to weight management, the timing of dining is pivotal, a new study indicates. At least in rodents, food proved especially fattening when consumed at the wrong time of day.

    As nocturnal animals, mice normally play and forage at night, often in complete darkness. With even dim chronic illumination of their nighttime environment, however, the animals’ hormonal dinner bells...

    10/11/2010 - 15:02 Nutrition, Earth & Environment, Body & Brain
  • Science & the Public

    How resveratrol (in grapes, peanuts and wine) fights fat and disease

    Resveratrol, a constituent of grapes, peanuts and certain other plants, can fight the proliferation of fat cells and improve the uptake of sugar from the blood, a pair of new studies show. Their findings suggest mechanisms to explain why grape products, including wine, have developed a reputation as heart healthy, obesity-fighting and beneficial for people developing diabetes.

    The...

    06/23/2010 - 22:21 Biomedicine, Nutrition, Humans & Society