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Your search has returned 22761 articles:
  • Growth Curve

    Hospital admissions show the opioid crisis affects kids, too

    As I’ve been reporting a story about the opioid epidemic, I’ve sorted through a lot of tragic numbers that make the astronomical spike in deaths and injuries related to the drugs feel more real.

    The rise in the abuse of opioids — powerfully addictive painkillers — is driven by adults. But kids are also swept up in the current, a new study makes clear. The number of children admitted to...

    03/14/2018 - 13:30 Health, Parenting
  • News

    Brain waves may focus attention and keep information flowing

    We can’t see it, but brains hum with electrical activity. Brain waves created by the coordinated firing of huge collections of nerve cells pinball around the brain. The waves can ricochet from the front of the brain to the back, or from deep structures all the way to the scalp and then back again.

    Called neuronal oscillations, these signals are known to accompany certain mental states....

    03/13/2018 - 13:00 Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Give double-layer graphene a twist and it superconducts

    LOS ANGELES — Give a graphene layer cake a twist and it superconducts — electrons flow freely through it without resistance. Made up of two layers of graphene, a form of carbon arranged in single-atom-thick sheets, the structure’s weird behavior suggests it may provide a fruitful playground for testing how certain unusual types of superconductors work, physicist Pablo Jarillo-Herrero of MIT...

    03/08/2018 - 16:10 Condensed Matter, Materials
  • News

    On Twitter, the lure of fake news is stronger than the truth

    There’s been a lot of talk about fake news running rampant online, but now there’s data to back up the discussion.

    An analysis of more than 4.5 million tweets and retweets posted from 2006 to 2017 indicates that inaccurate news stories spread faster and further on the social media platform than true stories. The research also suggests that people play a bigger role in sharing falsehoods...

    03/08/2018 - 14:00 Technology, Science & Society
  • News

    Some meteorites contain superconducting bits

    LOS ANGELES — In the search for new superconductors, scientists are leaving no stone — and no meteorite — unturned. A team of physicists has now found the unusual materials, famous for their ability to conduct electricity without resistance, within two space rocks.

    The discovery implies that small amounts of superconducting materials might be relatively common in meteorites, James...

    03/07/2018 - 17:04 Condensed Matter, Astronomy
  • News

    4 surprising things we just learned about Jupiter

    Bit by bit, Jupiter is revealing its deepest, darkest secrets.

    The latest findings are in from the Juno spacecraft. And they unveil the roots of the planet’s storms, what lies beneath the opaque atmosphere and a striking geometric layout of cyclones parked around the gas giant’s north and south poles.

    “We’re at the beginning of dissecting Jupiter,” says Juno mission leader Scott...

    03/07/2018 - 13:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Humans don’t get enough sleep. Just ask other primates.

    People have evolved to sleep much less than chimps, baboons or any other primate studied so far.

    A large comparison of primate sleep patterns finds that most species get somewhere between nine and 15 hours of shut-eye daily, while humans average just seven. An analysis of several lifestyle and biological factors, however, predicts people should get 9.55 hours, researchers report online...

    03/07/2018 - 07:00 Anthropology, Animals, Human Evolution
  • Feature

    When bogs burn, the environment takes a hit

    In 2015, massive wildfires burned through Indonesia, sending thick smoke and haze as far as Thailand.

    These fires were “the worst environmental disaster in modern history,” says Thomas Smith, a wildfire expert at King’s College London. Smith estimates that the fires and smoke killed 100,000 people in Indonesia and neighboring countries and caused billions of...

    03/06/2018 - 12:00 Ecosystems, Climate, Agriculture
  • It's Alive

    In a pack hunt, it’s every goatfish for itself

    The only fish known to hunt with wolf pack moves may not be true team players, just lemon-yellow me-firsts.

    Yellow saddle goatfish (Parupeneus cyclostomus) do more than school together as they dart over Indo-Pacific coral reefs. Like wolves, the goatfish take different roles in a pursuit. One or two fish may rush straight toward prey as the others shoot to the sides, blocking escape....

    03/06/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Evolution
  • News in Brief

    Google moves toward quantum supremacy with 72-qubit computer

    LOS ANGELES — Quantum computers are bulking up.

    Researchers from Google are testing a quantum computer with 72 quantum bits, or qubits, scientists reported March 5 at a meeting of the American Physical Society — a big step up from the company’s previous nine-qubit chip.

    The team hopes to use the larger quantum chip to demonstrate quantum supremacy for the first time, performing a...

    03/05/2018 - 17:17 Quantum Physics