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  • News

    Future quantum computing could exploit old technology

    Silicon transistors have been converted into the basic components of a quantum computer.

    Using modified versions of transistors used in smartphones, tablets and desktop computers, Australian engineers have built the first quantum logic gate in silicon for performing quantum computations. The gate, described October 5 in Nature...

    10/09/2015 - 14:17 Quantum Physics, Computing
  • Editor's Note

    General relativity centennial celebrates Einstein’s genius

    eva headshotEinstein is shorthand for genius, and describing everything Albert Einstein did to inspire that synonym would take a book, or multiple books (see...

    10/07/2015 - 11:40 Science & Society
  • Feature

    Special Report: Gravity’s Century

    In 1915, the universe was small and static. Space was smooth. Gravity pulled things to the ground. At least that’s the way it was in the minds of all but one exceptional physicist — Albert Einstein.

    After years of pondering the interplay of space, time, matter and gravity, Einstein produced, in a single month, an utter transformation of science’s conception of the cosmos: the general...

    10/07/2015 - 11:27 Science & Society, Cosmology, Astronomy, Physics
  • Feature

    Entanglement: Gravity's long-distance connection

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    When Albert Einstein scoffed at a “spooky” long-distance connection between particles, he wasn’t thinking about his general theory of relativity.

    Einstein’s century-old theory describes how gravity emerges when massive objects warp the fabric of space and time. Quantum entanglement, the spooky source of Einstein’s dismay, typically concerns tiny...

    10/07/2015 - 10:42 Quantum Physics, Physics
  • Context

    Top 10 subatomic surprises

    Neutrinos are popular among the people who award the Nobel prizes.

    In 1995 Fred Reines won the physics Nobel for detecting neutrinos, bizarre subatomic particles that some experts said could never be detected. In 2002, Ray Davis and...

    10/06/2015 - 16:52 Particle Physics, History of Science
  • Feature

    Using general relativity to magnify the cosmos

    One of the most powerful known magnifying lenses isn’t found on Earth. The lens is built from stars, gas and dark matter and lies about 4 billion light-years away. As astronomers peer through it, they are finding the seeds of galaxies that were scattered around the universe more than 13 billion years ago.

    The lens is known as Abell 2744, a cosmic pileup where four groups of galaxies are...

    10/06/2015 - 12:38 Astronomy, Cosmology, Physics
  • Reviews & Previews

    Centennial books illuminate Einstein’s greatest triumph

    You don’t need an anniversary as an excuse to write a book about Albert Einstein. But the centennial of his general theory of relativity has nonetheless provided an occasion for several new entries in the Einstein library. And even though general relativity — Einstein’s theory of gravity — has been thoroughly explored many times, some 2015 publications do offer new twists and insights.


    10/04/2015 - 07:00 History of Science, Science & Society, Physics, Cosmology
  • Feature

    Einstein's genius changed science's perception of gravity

    Albert Einstein opened humankind’s eyes to the universe.

    Before Einstein, space seemed featureless and changeless, as Isaac Newton had defined it two centuries earlier. And time, Newton declared, flowed at its own pace, oblivious to the clocks that measured it. But Einstein looked at space and time and saw a single dynamic stage — spacetime — on which matter and energy strutted,...

    10/04/2015 - 05:30 Astronomy, Physics, History of Science
  • News

    Quantum choice can be counterproductive

    When abiding by the laws of quantum physics, having options can make an otherwise simple task impossible. A new paper demonstrates that transmitting quantum messages becomes more difficult if the intended recipient offers the sender multiple options for the time and place of delivery.

    The strange finding, described online September 16 at, joins other paradoxes such as...

    09/22/2015 - 15:29 Quantum Physics
  • Feature

    Meet 10 scientists who are making their mark

    Just as in baseball, politics and Hollywood, science has its up-and-coming stars. They just don’t always get as much publicity as, say, Bryce Harper or Lupita Nyong’o. Most scientists are lucky to get a media mention as a name attached to a discovery. But their personal stories and change-the-world goals are worth some attention.


    09/22/2015 - 11:02 Science & Society