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Your search has returned 7 articles:
  • News

    Mice robbed of darkness fatten up

    When it comes to weight management, the timing of dining is pivotal, a new study indicates. At least in rodents, food proved especially fattening when consumed at the wrong time of day.

    As nocturnal animals, mice normally play and forage at night, often in complete darkness. With even dim chronic illumination of their nighttime environment, however, the animals’ hormonal dinner bells...

    10/11/2010 - 15:02 Nutrition, Earth & Environment, Body & Brain
  • Feature

    Light Impacts

    This is part two of a two-part series on lighting's environmental and human impacts. Part I: "Illuminating Changes," is available here.

    Erin Chesky was a sleep-troubled teen, typical of many. Despite going to bed early each night, this honor roll student struggled to doze off—sometimes lying awake until 3 a.m. Each morning, she fought equally hard to wake up at 5:30...

    05/23/2006 - 12:10
  • Feature

    Bright Lights, Big Cancer

    In late 1987, Richard G. Stevens, then at Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Wash., typed up a short letter and mailed it to Walter Willett at Harvard Medical School in Boston. The two epidemiologists had met just once, and Stevens wasn't confident that his 209-word note, or the suggestion that it contained about a possible contributor to breast cancer, would inspire any action.

    ...
    01/04/2006 - 14:23 Biomedicine
  • News

    Bright nights kindle cancers in mice

    Data from mice subjected to constant illumination suggest that artificial light may increase risks of lung and liver cancers and leukemia.

    Exposure to light at night reduces production of melatonin, a hormone that calibrates the body's biological clock and its secretion of estrogen (SN: 10/17/98, p. 248: http://www.sciencenews.org/pages/sn_arc98/10_17_98/19981017fob.asp). The latter...

    08/25/2004 - 09:01 Biomedicine
  • News

    Second cancer type linked to shift work

    Two years ago, a pair of research teams each reported finding an elevated risk of breast cancer among women who sometimes worked nightshifts. One of the teams now finds that those women also face an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

    Eva S. Schernhammer of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and her colleagues pored over data on 600 colorectal cancers diagnosed among 78,500 nurses...

    07/01/2003 - 18:56 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Herbal Lottery

    Echinacea is a commercial success. The dietary supplement–made from the flowers, stems, and leaves of the purple coneflower–has become a popular and lucrative over-the-counter cold remedy. It's also one of the few nutraceuticals–natural products with medicinal reputations–that have substantial scientific evidence to support its purported functions: Various studies suggest that echinacea...

    06/02/2003 - 18:34 Nutrition
  • News

    Cancer risk linked to night shifts

    Shift work is hard on the body. It's a schedule that reprograms the biological clock every few days. Those adjustments can disturb sleep patterns, impair mental acuity, and foster

    irritability. In fact, it might be even worse than that. Two new studies find evidence that women who work the graveyard shift also increase their chance of developing breast cancer.

    Both reports,...

    11/13/2001 - 13:25 Earth & Environment