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  • News

    Too Few Jaws: Shark declines let rays overgraze scallops

    A shortage of big sharks along the U.S. East Coast is letting their prey flourish, and that prey is going hog wild, demolishing bay scallop populations.

    That's the conclusion of researchers led by the late Ransom Myers of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, who died this week. Combining census surveys from the past 35 years, Myers' team found shrinking...

    03/28/2007 - 11:47 Animals
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition
  • News

    Ghostly Electrons: Particles flit through atom-thin islands

    Confine electrons within microscopically thin layers of material and weird things happen. Experiments on semiconductors in the 1980s demonstrated that to physicists (SN: 10/17/98, p. 247).

    Now, two independent research teams have found that electrons imprisoned within a carbon sheet one atom thick behave in yet other odd ways, unlike anything seen in other materials. The...

    11/09/2005 - 13:09 Physics
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Quick Fix: How invasive seaweed repairs its wounds

    Rapid self-healing is critical to the invasiveness of an alien green alga that's currently wreaking havoc in the Mediterranean Sea. Now, scientists have discerned the chemistry underlying this highly efficient repair process. That understanding may provide ideas for thwarting the seaweed's relentless spread.

    Frequently referred to as the "killer alga," Caulerpa taxifolia is a...

    03/30/2005 - 13:52 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents on...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • News

    New accord targets long-lived pollutants

    This week, negotiators from the United States and 121 other nations agreed to ban or phase out some of the world's most notorious chemicals. The 12 pollutants are renowned for their toxicity, long life, and propensity for leapfrogging around the world—often for decades.

    The targeted compounds include dioxins and structurally related furans; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); and...

    11/15/2004 - 12:15 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Lemon-scented products spawn pollutants

    While prepping for holiday guests, many hosts will deploy cleaners and air fresheners that impart a pleasant lemon or pine scent. Though they can mask stale smells, their fragrant ingredients—under certain conditions—may also be a rich source of indoor pollution, a study finds.

    Several years ago, Charles J. Weschler, a chemist at Telcordia Technologies in Red Bank, N.J., stumbled onto...

    10/27/2004 - 13:51 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Vitamin E targets dangerous inflammation

    People with diabetes face a high risk of heart attack and stroke. One apparent culprit is the chronic, low-grade inflammation that they develop. Megadoses of vitamin E can dramatically reduce that inflammation, a new study finds.

    Ishwarlal Jialal and Sridevi Devaraj of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas studied 47 men and women with adult-onset, or type II,...

    06/18/2004 - 16:31 Biomedicine
  • News

    Slimmer Ticks, Less Disease: Tick-semen protein is potential vaccine

    Pregnant ticks gain a lot of weight. In fact, after females mate and as they feed on a host's blood, they quickly grow to about 100 times their original size.

    Researchers have long suspected that the semen of male ticks contains a protein that causes this weight gain. Reuben Kaufman of the University of Alberta in Edmonton and his colleagues have now isolated such a protein,...

    04/14/2004 - 10:38 Biomedicine