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Your search has returned 15 articles:
  • News

    Laser printers can dirty the air

    The smaller an air-pollution particle is, the more likely it will be inhaled deep into the lungs, where it can trigger disease. A new study finds that office laser printers can spew especially small particles.

    Lidia Morawska of the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, says that her team stumbled onto the finding while attempting to evaluate the effectiveness of...

    09/05/2007 - 14:01 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Cholesterol boosts diesel toxicity

    Cholesterol poses a cardiovascular risk once it becomes transformed into an inflammatory building block of artery-clogging plaque. That process, which happens all the time, is triggered by oxidation. A new study finds that breathing nanoscale particles spewed by diesel-fuel combustion—also a common occurrence—may turn on genes that multiply cholesterol's inflammatory and atherosclerotic risks...

    08/08/2007 - 09:53 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Herbal therapy for beleaguered lawns

    Many people don't like the biting taste of mustard. Neither, it turns out, do sting nematodes—small, parasitic roundworms that siphon food from plant roots. That finding could prove good news for maintaining golf courses, sports fields, and other picture-perfect lawns.

    Some weeds and other plants naturally resist sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). Suspecting that these...

    06/21/2006 - 09:33 Plants
  • Feature

    Squirt Alert

    As scientific adviser to a group of Maine watermen, ecologist Larry Harris had heard his share of stories. But one tale, told to him 2 years ago, proved unforgettable. A fisherman related how he had been hauling up a dredge used to scout for scallops in nearby Cobscook Bay when he snagged something novel: a life form resembling blobs of pancake batter.

    In all his...

    12/18/2005 - 18:25 Ecology
  • News

    Instant Nano Blocks: One-step process makes trillions of DNA pyramids

    As if carrying life's genetic code weren't enough, DNA molecules are in demand these days as raw material for microscopic constructions. For instance, nanotechnologists have fashioned cubic and octahedral cages from the molecules (SN: 2/14/04, p. 99: Available to subscribers at Snappy DNA: Long strand folds into octahedron). Processes for crafting those frameworks, however, have been arduous...

    12/07/2005 - 11:57 Physics
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents on...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • News

    Lemon-scented products spawn pollutants

    While prepping for holiday guests, many hosts will deploy cleaners and air fresheners that impart a pleasant lemon or pine scent. Though they can mask stale smells, their fragrant ingredients—under certain conditions—may also be a rich source of indoor pollution, a study finds.

    Several years ago, Charles J. Weschler, a chemist at Telcordia Technologies in Red Bank, N.J., stumbled onto...

    10/27/2004 - 13:51 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Vitamin E targets dangerous inflammation

    People with diabetes face a high risk of heart attack and stroke. One apparent culprit is the chronic, low-grade inflammation that they develop. Megadoses of vitamin E can dramatically reduce that inflammation, a new study finds.

    Ishwarlal Jialal and Sridevi Devaraj of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas studied 47 men and women with adult-onset, or type II,...

    06/18/2004 - 16:31 Biomedicine
  • News

    Lithium increases gray matter in the brain

    Able to stabilize the mood swings of many people with manic depression, lithium revolutionized psychiatric therapy when the drug came on the scene several decades ago. Yet neuroscientists remain perplexed at how this potent medication works.

    Scientists in Detroit have now provided a clue that could help resolve that mystery. They find that about a month of treatment with the drug...

    06/18/2004 - 16:13 Biomedicine