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E.g., 11/24/2017
E.g., 11/24/2017
Your search has returned 4 articles:
  • Feature

    That's the Way the Spaghetti Crumbles

    Great scientists sometimes do silly experiments. The renowned physicist and Nobel prize winner Richard P. Feynman, for instance, once got it into his head to figure out why uncooked spaghetti doesn't snap neatly in two when you bend it far enough to break. Pay attention next time, and you'll notice that the pasta tends to shatter into three or more fragments of unequal lengths.

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    11/08/2005 - 11:51 Physics
  • Feature

    Empty Nets

    In the 1850s, 43 schooners from a single port, Beverly, Mass., plied the North Atlantic's Scotian shelf, which is prime cod territory in Canadian waters. Over the sides of the ships, crews dropped lines with single hooks and doggedly jigged their bait along the seafloor to entice the big predatory fish. Although the combined fleet used fewer than 1,200 hooks, the ships' logs indicate that...

    05/31/2005 - 18:30 Ecology
  • Feature

    The Rise of Antibubbles

    Two years into his doctoral research, which had him looking long and hard at bubbles rising in a liquid, Alberto Tufaile noticed something odd. Sometimes, a few small bubbles would circle around in his flasks instead of rising to the top. "I was worried because I couldn't explain what I was seeing," recalls Tufaile, now a physicist at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Ensnared by these...

    05/11/2004 - 14:04 Physics
  • Feature

    In Search of a Scientific Revolution

    Plenty of people claim to have theories that will revolutionize science. What's rare is for other scientists to take one of these schemes seriously. Yet that's what's happened since May 2002 when theoretical physicist Stephen Wolfram self-published a book in which he alleged to have found a new way to address the most difficult problems of science. Tellingly, he named this treatise A New Kind...

    08/12/2003 - 12:48 Humans & Society