Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

Search Content

E.g., 06/20/2019
E.g., 06/20/2019
Your search has returned 135 articles:
  • News

    Big footprints

    There are surprisingly large hidden costs to hot dogs, burgers, milk, and other animal products, finds a new report entitled Livestock’s Long Shadow. Prepared by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization in Rome, the report notes that animal agriculture is the second or third biggest contributor to "the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global."...

    01/10/2007 - 07:56 Agriculture
  • News

    Putting the kibosh on black cohosh

    The herbal supplement black cohosh, taken for relief of menopausal hot flashes, doesn't work any better than a placebo, a study finds.

    Previous research had brought mixed results. Nevertheless, sales of black cohosh have soared as women have turned away from estrogen-replacement therapy, which has been linked with an increased risk of stroke (SN: 4/15/06, p. 228: Available to...

    01/09/2007 - 13:36 Biomedicine
  • News

    Longer work hours may warm climate

    U.S. employees work an average of 16 percent more hours per year than most of their European counterparts do—often with no increased productivity—a new study notes. A longer workday requires more energy for heat, light, and power, and the atmospheric emissions from that extra energy use contribute substantially to U.S. releases of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide.

    U.S. workers...

    12/31/2006 - 11:35 Humans & Society
  • Food for Thought

    Organic Dairying Is on Upswing, But No Panacea

    This is part two of a two-part series on the economics of dairy farming. Part I: "Cow Power," is available at Cow Power.

    For 20 years, Steve Getz worked in the computer industry. Because he traveled a lot, "I came to hate airports and sitting on planes," he says. To ground himself on days off, Steve and his wife, Karen Getz, began dabbling...

    11/28/2006 - 13:52 Agriculture
  • Food for Thought

    Birds Don't Have to Be So Hot

    Last week, Iowa State University issued a news release about how long it takes to cook a turkey if you place it into the oven frozen. The answer: 5.5 hours for a 13- to 15-pound bird cooked in a 325°F oven.

    However, what really caught my attention was something a little lower in the release—that the U.S. Department of Agriculture had issued a statement earlier...

    11/20/2006 - 14:15 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Cola May Weaken Women's Bones

    Middle age and older women may want to limit their consumption of cola-flavored soft drinks. A new study links regular consumption of these beverages with reduced mineral density of hip bones in women past menopause. No similar hip vulnerability to cola showed up in men of the same age.

    The gender-specific finding was quite strong, notes Katherine L. Tucker of the Jean Mayer...

    10/24/2006 - 10:09 Nutrition
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Another Way Men and Women Differ

    At least until menopause, women face a lower risk than men do of artery-clogging heart disease. Michigan scientists now turn up one potential reason: before menopause, one of the avenues for clearing meal-derived fats from the blood operates better in women than in men of the same age. This makes the fat less available to the plaque-forming cells in women's arterial walls.

    ...

    08/30/2006 - 16:24 Nutrition
  • News

    Social jet lag: Need a smoke?

    From Munich, at the Euroscience Open Forum meeting

    People who have a hard time waking in the morning because their bodies' internal clocks are out of sync with their sleep schedules are said to have "social jet lag." Researchers in Europe have determined that the phenomenon strongly correlates with smoking.

    Battling one's biological clock can leave people weary in the same way as...

    08/01/2006 - 12:19
  • News

    Farm-Fuel Feedback: Soybeans have advantages over corn

    A new analysis of two commercial biofuels finds that while both provide more energy than they consume, soybean biodiesel gives more bang for the buck than ethanol made from corn does.

    Corn-grain ethanol and soybean biodiesel are the two major alternative transportation fuels in the United States. The biofuels can replace gasoline and diesel, respectively. A team of Minnesota ecologists...

    07/12/2006 - 12:06 Technology