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Your search has returned 15 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Troubling Meaty 'Estrogen'

    Women take note. Researchers find that a chemical that forms in overcooked meat, especially charred portions, is a potent mimic of estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. That's anything but appetizing, since studies have linked a higher lifetime cumulative exposure to estrogen in women with an elevated risk of breast cancer.

    Indeed, the new finding offers a "biologically...

    10/17/2007 - 01:38 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Light Impacts

    This is part two of a two-part series on lighting's environmental and human impacts. Part I: "Illuminating Changes," is available here.

    Erin Chesky was a sleep-troubled teen, typical of many. Despite going to bed early each night, this honor roll student struggled to doze off—sometimes lying awake until 3 a.m. Each morning, she fought equally hard to wake up at 5:30...

    05/23/2006 - 12:10 Other
  • Feature

    That's the Way the Spaghetti Crumbles

    Great scientists sometimes do silly experiments. The renowned physicist and Nobel prize winner Richard P. Feynman, for instance, once got it into his head to figure out why uncooked spaghetti doesn't snap neatly in two when you bend it far enough to break. Pay attention next time, and you'll notice that the pasta tends to shatter into three or more fragments of unequal lengths.

    ...
    11/08/2005 - 11:51 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • News

    Warm Ice: Frozen water forms at room temperature

    Zap a layer of water with a strong electric field and, experiments dating back years suggest, some of the liquid freezes, even at comfortable, shirtsleeve temperatures. New experiments indicate that the electric field needn't be so strong. If this result holds, it would indicate that warm ice could appear on a range of confining surfaces, including the minuscule crevices in ordinary rocks....

    08/24/2005 - 12:00 Physics
  • News

    Realistic Time Machine? New design could forgo exotic ingredient

    The laws of physics seem to allow time travel, but no one has had much hope of building an actual time machine because it would take such exotic conditions and materials.

    Now, physicist Amos Ori of the Technion Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa has come up with a potentially more practical time machine design. Unlike most previous proposals, this one requires only normal matter...

    07/13/2005 - 13:17 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Omega-3's May Hit Food Labels

    The Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will allow food manufacturers to make health claims for two omega-3 fatty acids—oils typically found in coldwater fish. Food labels can now note that products containing these oils might provide some protection from heart disease.

    The oils carry unwieldy names and so go by their acronyms: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and...

    09/22/2004 - 18:36 Nutrition
  • News

    Flexible E-Paper: Plastic circuits drive paperlike displays

    In a major step toward electronic paper that works like a computer monitor yet feels and behaves like a page of a book, researchers in the Netherlands have made electronic-ink displays on flexible plastic sheets.

    A U.S. company developed the electronic ink over the past several years. "Just like your newspaper, you can see it in bright light, dim light, or from all angles...

    01/28/2004 - 11:47 Materials
  • News

    Cool Cosmos: Orbiting telescope views infrared universe

    Astronomers this week unveiled some really cool images–along with some positively chilling spectra. The new images include pictures of a hidden stellar nursery and the first spectra ever taken of organic material in a remote galaxy. An infrared observatory, the Spitzer Space Telescope, had gathered the data since its launch last August.

    The telescope "will change...

    12/17/2003 - 08:53 Astronomy
  • News

    Spying a planet in star's dusty veil

    To examine the dust disk encircling a young star 330 light-years away, scientists at the University of Arizona in Tucson used an emerging technique called nulling interferometry to block out the star's light. When they looked further, they found clues suggesting that a large gaseous planet was forming near the star, designated HD 100546.

    Astronomers are eager to study the disruptions in...

    12/08/2003 - 10:01 Astronomy