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Your search has returned 19 articles:
  • News

    Are pollutants shrinking polar bear gonads?

    The more polluted a polar bear's fat, the more likely its reproductive organs will be undersize, scientists find.

    They collected gonads from 55 male and 44 female bears killed legally by subsistence hunters in east Greenland. The scientists then tested the bears' fat for pollutants that might affect sex hormones.

    Especially in immature males, testis length diminished with...

    09/05/2006 - 00:59 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Social jet lag: Need a smoke?

    From Munich, at the Euroscience Open Forum meeting

    People who have a hard time waking in the morning because their bodies' internal clocks are out of sync with their sleep schedules are said to have "social jet lag." Researchers in Europe have determined that the phenomenon strongly correlates with smoking.

    Battling one's biological clock can leave people weary in the same way as...

    08/01/2006 - 12:19 Other
  • News

    True-pal lizards may show odd gene

    Willing to stand between the neighborhood bully and your pal next door?

    California lizards doing just that may have a genetic quirk that scientists have been looking for since the 1960s but hardly ever found.

    The search for the genetic phenomenon began as theorists wondered why altruism doesn't just self-sacrifice itself out of existence, explains Andrew G. McAdam of...

    05/24/2006 - 08:42 Animals
  • News

    Dementia off the Menu: Mediterranean diet tied to low Alzheimer's risk

    People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely than their peers to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research on elderly Manhattan residents. The study is the first to link brain benefits to a comprehensive dietary pattern rather than to individual foods or nutrients, say the scientists who performed the research.

    Traditional Mediterranean menus are rich in...

    04/18/2006 - 22:06 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Squirt Alert

    As scientific adviser to a group of Maine watermen, ecologist Larry Harris had heard his share of stories. But one tale, told to him 2 years ago, proved unforgettable. A fisherman related how he had been hauling up a dredge used to scout for scallops in nearby Cobscook Bay when he snagged something novel: a life form resembling blobs of pancake batter.

    In all his...

    12/18/2005 - 18:25 Ecology
  • News

    Instant Nano Blocks: One-step process makes trillions of DNA pyramids

    As if carrying life's genetic code weren't enough, DNA molecules are in demand these days as raw material for microscopic constructions. For instance, nanotechnologists have fashioned cubic and octahedral cages from the molecules (SN: 2/14/04, p. 99: Available to subscribers at Snappy DNA: Long strand folds into octahedron). Processes for crafting those frameworks, however, have been arduous...

    12/07/2005 - 11:57 Physics
  • News

    Ghostly Electrons: Particles flit through atom-thin islands

    Confine electrons within microscopically thin layers of material and weird things happen. Experiments on semiconductors in the 1980s demonstrated that to physicists (SN: 10/17/98, p. 247).

    Now, two independent research teams have found that electrons imprisoned within a carbon sheet one atom thick behave in yet other odd ways, unlike anything seen in other materials. The...

    11/09/2005 - 13:09 Physics
  • News

    Silk and soap settle a century-old flap

    For more than 120 years, the English physicist Lord Rayleigh has had the last word on why flags flap in the breeze. A keen observer who figured out how the scattering of light makes the sky blue, Rayleigh attributed flag flutter to the interplay between deformations of a flag's surface and subtle gusting of the wind. Because the tiniest ripples in the flag and puffs of wind end up amplifying...

    11/15/2004 - 12:22 Physics
  • News

    Vitamin E targets dangerous inflammation

    People with diabetes face a high risk of heart attack and stroke. One apparent culprit is the chronic, low-grade inflammation that they develop. Megadoses of vitamin E can dramatically reduce that inflammation, a new study finds.

    Ishwarlal Jialal and Sridevi Devaraj of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas studied 47 men and women with adult-onset, or type II,...

    06/18/2004 - 16:31 Biomedicine
  • News

    Stone Age Combustion: Fire use proposed at ancient Israeli site

    Our prehistoric ancestors may have been a fiery bunch. By about 750,000 years ago, the inhabitants of a lakeshore in what is now northern Israel had learned to build fires in hearths, a research team contends.

    For the next 100,000 years, Stone Age folk who frequented the Middle Eastern site used hearths for what must have been a variety of purposes, including staying warm,...

    04/28/2004 - 13:29 Archaeology