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E.g., 11/20/2017
E.g., 11/20/2017
Your search has returned 20 articles:
  • News

    Fish as Farmers: Reef residents tend an algal crop

    A damselfish cultivates underwater gardens of an algal species that researchers haven't found growing on its own.

    The special alga could be the fishy version of people's domesticated crops, says Hiroki Hata of Kyoto University in Japan. Growth tests of the alga, surveys of its distribution, and genetic analyses support that idea, he and Makoto Kato say in an upcoming Biology...

    08/09/2006 - 12:05 Ecology
  • Feature

    That's the Way the Spaghetti Crumbles

    Great scientists sometimes do silly experiments. The renowned physicist and Nobel prize winner Richard P. Feynman, for instance, once got it into his head to figure out why uncooked spaghetti doesn't snap neatly in two when you bend it far enough to break. Pay attention next time, and you'll notice that the pasta tends to shatter into three or more fragments of unequal lengths.

    ...
    11/08/2005 - 11:51 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Light Therapy for Tainted Fish

    Aquaculture—farming fish for our dinner tables—is a big and growing international industry. Because many of the tastiest and most-profitable farmed fish are carnivores, their prepared diets usually include flakes or powders made from low-value fish, from fish processed for their oil, or from scraps of fish prepared for restaurants and supermarkets. Fish farmers happily bulk up their products...

    10/20/2005 - 12:06 Nutrition
  • News

    Champion of strength is forged in mighty anvil

    A newly created form of carbon has captured the crown of world's strongest known material. A team of researchers in Germany and France made the new material using a specialized, multijawed anvil that simultaneously squeezed and heated a powder of all-carbon molecules known as buckyballs.

    At 200,000 times atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 2,500 kelvins, the powder...

    09/13/2005 - 12:18 Physics
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Dee for Danger: Chickadees add notes as threat grows

    Biologists report new progress in translating the sophisticated communication system of black-capped chickadees.

    When the little birds spot a lurking predator, they burst out with variations on their "chickadee" calls. Tests with 15 predator species show that birds vary those calls depending on how dangerous the predator is, says Christopher N. Templeton of the University of...

    06/22/2005 - 09:47 Animals
  • Feature

    Empty Nets

    In the 1850s, 43 schooners from a single port, Beverly, Mass., plied the North Atlantic's Scotian shelf, which is prime cod territory in Canadian waters. Over the sides of the ships, crews dropped lines with single hooks and doggedly jigged their bait along the seafloor to entice the big predatory fish. Although the combined fleet used fewer than 1,200 hooks, the ships' logs indicate that...

    05/31/2005 - 18:30 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Seeing Red and Finding Fraudulent Fish

    Peter B. Marko wanted his marine biology graduate students to be able to do DNA fingerprinting of tissues. So, he gave them the assignment of analyzing 22 samples of red snapper meat from fish retailers in eight states. The students extracted DNA from each piece of fish, copied it so there would be enough material to analyze, then matched the DNA in each batch against an archived map of the...

    07/20/2004 - 18:33 Nutrition
  • News

    Farmer ant species may have lost all its males

    From Oaxaca, Mexico, at a meeting of the Animal Behavior Society

    Minuscule gardeners that grow fungus for food may be the first ant species that scientists have discovered to have no power of sexual reproduction. Several lines of evidence suggest that the species Mycocepurus smithii consists only of females that produce daughters from unfertilized eggs, says Anna Himler of the...

    06/29/2004 - 10:14 Animals
  • Feature

    The Rise of Antibubbles

    Two years into his doctoral research, which had him looking long and hard at bubbles rising in a liquid, Alberto Tufaile noticed something odd. Sometimes, a few small bubbles would circle around in his flasks instead of rising to the top. "I was worried because I couldn't explain what I was seeing," recalls Tufaile, now a physicist at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Ensnared by these...

    05/11/2004 - 14:04 Physics