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Your search has returned 15 articles:
  • News

    CT heart scans: Risk climbs as age at screening falls

    Use of computed tomography (CT) scans to investigate heart blockages is becoming common, especially for people entering emergency rooms with severe chest pain. A new study quantifies a downside to these rapid and relatively noninvasive scans: Their X rays can substantially increase an individual's cancer risk. Younger patients, especially women, incur the greatest increases.

    Andrew J....

    08/08/2007 - 10:45 Biomedicine
  • News

    Light Pedaling: Photonic brakes are vital for circuits

    Just as optical fibers have replaced most electrical wires for long-distance telecommunications, light-based circuits may replace electrical ones in applications involving vast flows of data within computers and networks. Now, a team of industrial researchers has taken what may be a crucial step toward such photonic circuitry: They've found a way to dial down the speed of light within...

    11/02/2005 - 12:01 Physics
  • Feature

    A Galling Business

    As a consultant to the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Jill Robinson walked onto her first bear farm 12 years ago. At this facility in southern China, she found each bear standing not on a solid floor but on bars in a cage too small for the animal to take even one step. Although the Asiatic black bear is normally a solitary and clean animal, these cages were crowded together in...

    10/06/2005 - 12:25 Humans & Society
  • News

    Save the frogs

    A "metaphorical Noah's Ark" is how Claude Gascon describes the action plan drafted last month at an Amphibian Conservation Summit in Washington, D.C. "If implemented, it would hopefully reverse the trend in amphibian extinctions," says Gascon, an officer of the D.C.–based Conservation International and chairman of the World Conservation Union's Global Amphibian Specialist Group.

    ...

    09/28/2005 - 09:46 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Head-to-Head Comparison: Coils top clips in brain-aneurysm treatment

    Insertion of a tiny metal coil into a bleeding aneurysm in the brain appears safer in the long run for some patients than a more-established treatment that requires brain surgery, researchers find.

    A brain aneurysm—an abnormal bulge in a weakened blood vessel—is a tragedy in waiting. Aneurysms sometimes rupture, and the leaking blood can cause brain damage ending in disability or...

    09/14/2005 - 10:55 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Calcium's lingering effect slows growths

    From Anaheim, Calif., at a meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    Taking calcium supplements protects against colorectal cancer even years after a person stops taking them, a study finds.

    Starting in the early 1990s, scientists randomly assigned 930 patients with a history of precancerous growths in the colon or rectum to receive either a daily calcium tablet or...

    05/03/2005 - 10:05 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Trimming with Tea

    Here's a new diet drink to help people shed pounds: oolong tea enriched with some of the antioxidant compounds that naturally occur in green tea. Men who drank this hybrid brew during a 3-month study in Japan lost 1.1 more kilograms in weight than did men drinking conventional oolong tea—with no other difference in their respective diets or exercise.

    The hybrid tea also...

    02/09/2005 - 13:29 Nutrition
  • News

    Wafting pesticides taint far-flung frogs

    Federal researchers have added new evidence to the growing case that agricultural pesticides blowing into California's wilderness areas have played a role in mysterious declines in frog populations.

    Traces of the common pesticides Diazinon and chlorpyrifos showed up in more than half the Pacific tree frogs sampled in Yosemite National Park, but in only 9 percent of the frogs...

    11/15/2004 - 12:33 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    A Forget-Me-Not Dietary Supplement?

    By the time most people reach their 40s, the mind has lost some of its youthful nimbleness. They learn a little more slowly. They forget more frequently. Sometimes, they don't remember where they put the car keys or the name of that popular actor.

    Although minor memory lapses are no big deal, they might hint at a vulnerability to serious aging-related memory impairments somewhere...

    11/20/2003 - 16:09 Nutrition