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Your search has returned 144 articles:
  • News

    New solutions for unused drugs

    A dilute stream of prescription drugs flows through the nation's rivers. To help cut that flow, representatives of the federal government and a pharmacists' trade group want consumers to stop flushing most old drugs down the toilet.

    Some 3 to 7 percent of dispensed medicines go unused, according to estimates by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America in...

    04/03/2007 - 18:21 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Waistline Worry: Common chemicals might boost obesity

    A family of chemicals implicated in testosterone declines may also be contributing to recent spikes in obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.

    Phthalates show up in a wide range of manufactured items, from cosmetics to vinyl flooring to medical devices and drug coatings. With people's extensive exposure to phthalates, the chemicals' breakdown products, or metabolites, appear in...

    03/21/2007 - 08:07 Chemistry
  • Feature

    Herbal Herbicides

    Certain plants are picky about the company they keep. Once established, walnuts and some sandy shrubs, for instance, create a virtually barren border of ground around them. Many other plants aren't quite so antisocial. They permit numerous species into their neighborhoods, while barring a few plant types.

    Chemical defenses play a major role in...

    03/13/2007 - 10:44 Agriculture
  • News

    2006: Hottest year in U.S. history

    Preliminary analysis of weather data gathered from more than 1,200 sites across the continental United States indicates that last year was the warmest on record.

    The average temperature for 2006 was 12.8°C (55°F), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists reported on the agency's website Jan. 9. That's about 1.2°C above the average temperature for the 20th...

    01/17/2007 - 07:38 Earth
  • News

    Alien Alert: Shrimpy invader raises big concerns

    In November, an unusual swarm of tiny critters caught the attention of a crewmember on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration boat docked in a Lake Michigan channel. He asked Steven Pothoven of NOAA's Great Lakes environmental field station at Muskegon, Mich., what the critters were.

    "I could see they weren't fish, so I netted some," the biologist recalls. Under...

    01/10/2007 - 10:30 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Sea Turtles—What Not To Eat

    At dozens of beaches around the world, huge female sea turtles come back each year at about the same time. They slowly haul themselves out of the water near the places they themselves hatched, dig shallow holes in the sand, and lay clutches of eggs. The predictability of the turtles' return has made capture of the endangered reptiles and their eggs a reliable bonanza for poachers.

    ...
    09/14/2006 - 12:22 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Bad-News Beauties

    With striking red, black, and white stripes decorating its body, fins, and some dozen spines along its head, back, and sides, the red lionfish is at once beautiful and frightening. The football-shaped fish can grow up to 18 inches long and is poisonous to the touch. At smaller sizes, this subtropical fish from Asia is extremely popular for hobbyists with saltwater aquariums, but the red...

    09/05/2006 - 14:56 Ecology
  • News

    Plastics agent worsens skin allergies

    Low doses of one of the most commonly used softeners in plastics can aggravate dust-mite allergy, researchers report.

    The plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is ubiquitous in air, water, and most people's bodies. It's in plastics used for toys, food packaging, medical products, and housewares.

    A few earlier studies had correlated allergy severity with exposure to DEHP in...

    09/05/2006 - 01:53 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Another Way Men and Women Differ

    At least until menopause, women face a lower risk than men do of artery-clogging heart disease. Michigan scientists now turn up one potential reason: before menopause, one of the avenues for clearing meal-derived fats from the blood operates better in women than in men of the same age. This makes the fat less available to the plaque-forming cells in women's arterial walls.

    ...

    08/30/2006 - 16:24 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Juice May Slow Prostate Cancer Growth (with recipe)

    Prostate cancer will claim the lives of an estimated 30,000 men in the United States this year. The second leading cause of cancer death in men, its incidence climbs with age. In Western countries, the disease is reaching nearly epidemic proportions among the elderly. However, the cancer can grow so slowly that many men with prostate cancer will die of something else first.

    ...
    08/10/2006 - 13:46 Nutrition