Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 09/19/2017
E.g., 09/19/2017
Your search has returned 23 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Troubling Meaty 'Estrogen'

    Women take note. Researchers find that a chemical that forms in overcooked meat, especially charred portions, is a potent mimic of estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. That's anything but appetizing, since studies have linked a higher lifetime cumulative exposure to estrogen in women with an elevated risk of breast cancer.

    Indeed, the new finding offers a "biologically...

    10/17/2007 - 01:38 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Venting Concerns

    Researchers cruising the South Pacific between Tonga and Fiji study huge snails that, aided by an abundance of bacteria housed in their gills, feed off plumes of metal-rich compounds at active hydrothermal vents. Scientists working off the California coast use chemical-sniffing probes, robotically driven subs, and seafloor-tethered temperature sensors to watch flows of lava pave over a once-...

    10/03/2006 - 10:43 Humans & Society
  • News

    Terrific Timekeeper: Optical atomic clock beats world standard

    Physicists in Colorado say that they've refined an innovative atomic clock to be more precise than the breed of clocks that's been the best for 50 years.

    The advance indicates that the reign of atomic clocks tuned to the element cesium is coming to an end, says physicist James C. Bergquist of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colo., who led the...

    07/19/2006 - 11:23 Physics
  • News

    Wary male spiders woo lifelessly

    Certain male spiders confront the threat of a cannibalistic female with a novel tactic: They play dead while having sex.

    Nursery spiders (Pisaura mirabilis) belong to a family known for violent females that, on occasion, attack and eat males attempting courtship, notes Trine Bilde of Århus University in Denmark.

    Biologists already knew that males of this species have one method...

    03/28/2006 - 11:53 Animals
  • News

    Revisiting Einstein's incomplete theory

    Scientists have long known that Albert Einstein skipped something a century ago when he analyzed Brownian motion—the jiggling of particles in a fluid, such as pollen in water. Now, researchers using measurements of unprecedented precision have observed the discrepancy between Einstein's model and a single particle's path.

    In a landmark 1905 study that helped establish the existence of...

    11/08/2005 - 13:29 Physics
  • News

    Champion of strength is forged in mighty anvil

    A newly created form of carbon has captured the crown of world's strongest known material. A team of researchers in Germany and France made the new material using a specialized, multijawed anvil that simultaneously squeezed and heated a powder of all-carbon molecules known as buckyballs.

    At 200,000 times atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 2,500 kelvins, the powder...

    09/13/2005 - 12:18 Physics
  • Feature

    Making Stuff Last

    Around the world, archives, museums, and their storage facilities brim with society's most prized objects. Some have been stashed on dusty back shelves for decades, while others bask under spotlights and curious gazes.

    If you're a patron of museums and archives, how can you be sure that on those shelves or under that glass, the treasures you value aren't...

    11/08/2004 - 17:25 Materials
  • Feature

    Extreme Impersonations

    Extreme physical conditions have a way of bringing out the strangest behaviors that nature can muster. Just ask physicist John E. Thomas. Two years ago, he and his colleagues at Duke University in Durham, N.C., were working with intense lasers in a high-vacuum chamber at temperatures next to absolute zero. They were manipulating tiny clouds of lithium gas. When the scientists turned off the...

    09/11/2004 - 17:58 Physics
  • News

    Tiny Timepiece: Atomic clock could fit almost anywhere

    Physicists have shrunk the high-tech heart of an atomic clock to the size of a rice grain. This dramatic miniaturization may lead to widespread use of atomic clocks in battery-powered devices such as global positioning system (GPS) receivers, wireless computers, and cell phones, says John Kitching, leader of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) team in Boulder, Colo.,...

    09/01/2004 - 13:01 Technology
  • Feature

    Starting from Square One

    Quarks are the smaller-than-a-proton particles without which there would be no stars, dogs, or breakfast burritos. In 1986, after a dozen frustrating years of trying to find ways of using computers to calculate properties of quark-containing entities such as protons and neutrons, Kenneth G. Wilson threw in the towel at a physics meeting. Wilson, who had already won a Nobel prize for previous...

    08/03/2004 - 10:16 Physics