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Your search has returned 19 articles:
  • Food for Thought

    Troubling Meaty 'Estrogen'

    Women take note. Researchers find that a chemical that forms in overcooked meat, especially charred portions, is a potent mimic of estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. That's anything but appetizing, since studies have linked a higher lifetime cumulative exposure to estrogen in women with an elevated risk of breast cancer.

    Indeed, the new finding offers a "biologically...

    10/17/2007 - 01:38 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Leaden Chocolates

    Here's something that might give you pause after Halloween: Chocolates are among the more lead-contaminated foods. A new study has probed the source of chocolate's lead and concludes it's not the cocoa bean. Its concentrations of the toxic metal were among the lowest recorded for any foodstuff.

    The issue of lead-tainted chocolates is hardly new. Indeed, it was the...

    11/03/2005 - 16:10 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Morphing Memory

    Anyone who purchases an electronic camera, cell phone, voice recorder, travel disk, or PDA, typically brings home a stick, card, or some other medium containing a chip ready to store information via a technology known as flash memory. Last year, consumers worldwide bought almost $12 billion worth of flash products, which depend on electrons to store data. The semiconductor industry expects...

    05/31/2005 - 21:29 Technology
  • Feature

    Making Stuff Last

    Around the world, archives, museums, and their storage facilities brim with society's most prized objects. Some have been stashed on dusty back shelves for decades, while others bask under spotlights and curious gazes.

    If you're a patron of museums and archives, how can you be sure that on those shelves or under that glass, the treasures you value aren't...

    11/08/2004 - 17:25 Materials
  • Feature

    Breaking the Law

    Hopeful inventors have for centuries tried to create machines that would run forever: gizmos such as wheels that turn unceasingly with no motor to drive them and engines that endlessly exploit the heat in the oceans to power ships.

    The consequences of devising such perpetual motion machines would be wondrous because these tools would unleash energy without consuming fuel.

    ...

    01/16/2004 - 17:00 Physics
  • Feature

    Warm-Blooded Plants?

    "The dead-horse arum of Corsica looks and smells like the south end of a horse that died going north," says Roger Seymour. He's actually talking about a plant, and a more prosaic soul might add that it belongs to the same family as calla lilies and jack-in-the-pulpits. Seymour is a zoologist, and the plants he studies show an animalistic feature: They can generate body heat. Most plants,...

    12/07/2003 - 18:02 Plants
  • News

    North vs. Northwest: Lewis and Clark diaries provide directional clue

    When Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set off to explore the Louisiana Territory in 1804, President Thomas Jefferson directed them to note the location of interesting points along the way. The explorers diligently calculated latitude and longitude and recorded compass bearings as they traversed the continent.

    But compasses have a major drawback for creating long-lasting...

    10/01/2003 - 11:13 Earth
  • Feature

    Microbial Materials

    Bone. Nerve. Muscle. Horn. Hide. Silk. With ingenious assemblages of atoms and molecules, biology produces fantastic substances that have long inspired scientists to develop the synthetic materials of the modern landscape. Lately, materials scientists have turned to biology's smallest individuals–viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Not only can these microbes be coaxed to produce high-tech...

    06/30/2003 - 13:08 Materials
  • News

    Super Fibers: Nanotubes make tough threads

    The superior mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes have intrigued materials scientists for a decade. But they've struggled to take advantage of the hollow tubes, just nanometers wide, for macroscopic projects.

    Now, researchers have spun the tubes into composite fibers that are tougher than steel, Kevlar, or spider silk. The new fibers appear to be...

    06/11/2003 - 10:23 Materials
  • Feature

    Words Get in the Way

    Law-enforcement officials typically solicit descriptions of criminals from eyewitnesses, often just after an offense has occurred. It stands to reason that thorough accounts by those who saw what happened will help investigators round up the likeliest suspects. Eyewitnesses can then pick the criminals out of a lineup. When crime-scene interviewing had its first brush with memory research in...

    04/15/2003 - 10:25 Other