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Your search has returned 59 articles:
  • News

    Floral Shocker: Blooms shake roots of flowering-plant family

    Imagine discovering a mammal without mammary glands or an insect with eight legs. Aquatic herbs in the genus Hydatella pose a similar paradox—they lack a defining developmental feature of flowering plants, raising questions about their evolution and rampant speciation during the past 135 million years.

    Evolutionary biologists group together organisms that share unique traits...

    03/19/2008 - 13:25 Plants
  • News

    Spying Vision Cells: Eye's motion detectors are finally found

    The eye's retina does more than register images the way film or a digital camera detector does. To allow it to begin analyzing an image, the retina has specialized nerve cells that respond to motion or other important features in the image detected by the light-sensing rod and cone cells.

    Scientists discovered the specialized cells that sense motion in the retinas of cats and other...

    10/10/2007 - 15:30
  • News

    Tea compound aids dying brain cells

    From Washington, D.C., at the Fourth International Scientific Symposium on Tea and Human Health

    A constituent of green tea can revive moribund brain cells, Israeli researchers report. The team experimented with animal neurons that had been chemically poisoned to model the death of dopamine-producing cells in Parkinson's disease.

    In a test-tube study, low doses of epigallocatechin...

    09/26/2007 - 12:04 Biomedicine
  • News

    Universities seek armchair astronomers

    Nonscientists and researchers alike have a chance to see something no one else ever has—a few of the million far-off galaxies that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has recently photographed. The price of admission: People viewing the new images online must do a little work for the astronomers in charge, classifying individual galaxies as either spiral armed or elliptical collections of stars....

    07/23/2007 - 14:59 Humans & Society
  • Food for Thought

    Crusty Chemistry

    Want to make a piece of pizza healthier? Try using whole-wheat dough. Give it a full 2 days to rise, and then cook the tomato pie a little longer and hotter than usual. That was the recipe shared last week by researchers at the American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago.

    Jeffrey Moore and Liangli Lucy Yu of the University of Maryland at College Park have been experimenting...

    04/03/2007 - 19:28 Nutrition
  • News

    Pollution Fallout: Are unattractive males Great-gram's fault?

    A new study of mate preferences in rodents raises the prospect that pollutant exposures can have behavioral repercussions that persist generation after generation. In the experiment, female rats shunned males whose grandfathers had been exposed in the womb to a fungicide used on fruit crops.

    Though brief, the vinclozolin exposures occurred when the fetal males' reproductive organs were...

    03/28/2007 - 12:49 Earth & Environment
  • News

    Old plants were lost in the grass

    An obscure family of small, narrow-leaved water plants that have for years been classified as oddball relatives of grasses turns out to represent one of the most ancient surviving lineages of flowering plants, researchers say.

    These plants, the Hydatellaceae, belong with water lilies near the base of the family tree of flowering plants, say Sean Graham of the University of...

    03/27/2007 - 19:12 Plants
  • News

    Waistline Worry: Common chemicals might boost obesity

    A family of chemicals implicated in testosterone declines may also be contributing to recent spikes in obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.

    Phthalates show up in a wide range of manufactured items, from cosmetics to vinyl flooring to medical devices and drug coatings. With people's extensive exposure to phthalates, the chemicals' breakdown products, or metabolites, appear in...

    03/21/2007 - 08:07 Chemistry
  • News

    Alien Alert: Shrimpy invader raises big concerns

    In November, an unusual swarm of tiny critters caught the attention of a crewmember on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration boat docked in a Lake Michigan channel. He asked Steven Pothoven of NOAA's Great Lakes environmental field station at Muskegon, Mich., what the critters were.

    "I could see they weren't fish, so I netted some," the biologist recalls. Under...

    01/10/2007 - 10:30 Ecology
  • Food for Thought

    Sea Turtles—What Not To Eat

    At dozens of beaches around the world, huge female sea turtles come back each year at about the same time. They slowly haul themselves out of the water near the places they themselves hatched, dig shallow holes in the sand, and lay clutches of eggs. The predictability of the turtles' return has made capture of the endangered reptiles and their eggs a reliable bonanza for poachers.

    ...

    09/14/2006 - 12:22 Earth & Environment