Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 06/22/2017
E.g., 06/22/2017
Your search has returned 29 articles:
  • News

    Gene dispensers

    From Chicago, at the American Chemical Society Meeting

    Researchers have developed a new means for transferring genes to treat diseases. The gene therapy method relies on a nanoscale architecture with many alternating layers of polyester and DNA. Once this material is inside the body, water degrades the polyester layer by layer, for a slow, controlled release of genetic material to...

    04/10/2007 - 15:16 Chemistry
  • Feature

    Herbal Herbicides

    Certain plants are picky about the company they keep. Once established, walnuts and some sandy shrubs, for instance, create a virtually barren border of ground around them. Many other plants aren't quite so antisocial. They permit numerous species into their neighborhoods, while barring a few plant types.

    Chemical defenses play a major role in...

    03/13/2007 - 10:44 Agriculture
  • News

    Keep on Going: Busy seniors live longer, more proof that it pays to stay active

    Elderly people who bustle around the house, spend much time on their feet, climb stairs, and hold down jobs might be buying themselves precious years of life.

    In a new study, researchers used a precise measure of calorie burning to assess activity. A total of 302 people, ages 70 to 82, completed questionnaires regarding their daily activities. All the volunteers got around without help...

    07/12/2006 - 13:31 Biomedicine
  • Food for Thought

    Fruity Relief for Weekend Warriors

    After 2 years of planning, you're finally able to afford a long weekend off for that ski trip to Aspen. The first day out, you put in 5 or 6 hours working your way down the slopes. You had planned to do the same thing each of the next 2 days—until you awake feeling sore from head to toe. The next day you feel even worse, so you settle for spending the rest of your trip in the lodge, sipping...

    06/29/2006 - 12:26 Nutrition
  • News

    Tipsy Superfluids: Glimpsing off-kilter quantum clouds

    Physicists last year created an exotic state of matter previously unattainable in the laboratory but whose characteristics theorists have debated for more than 40 years. The latest probes of the new state suggest that the material—a cloud of ultracold atoms that's imbalanced with regard to a quantum property known as spin—behaves differently than most theorists had anticipated.

    ...

    03/22/2006 - 13:54 Physics
  • Food for Thought

    Inflammation-Fighting Fat

    Arthritis-ameliorating cheese, anyone? Asthma-moderating yogurt? How about a scoop of lupus-fighting ice cream? Although such foods don't yet exist, they might one day. Data from a new study finds that an unusual fatty acid, a type of dairy fat, can modulate the injurious, runaway inflammation that underlies these and many other diseases.

    The agent is a variant of the essential...

    10/26/2005 - 15:36 Nutrition
  • Feature

    A Galling Business

    As a consultant to the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Jill Robinson walked onto her first bear farm 12 years ago. At this facility in southern China, she found each bear standing not on a solid floor but on bars in a cage too small for the animal to take even one step. Although the Asiatic black bear is normally a solitary and clean animal, these cages were crowded together in...

    10/06/2005 - 12:25 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • News

    Bacterial Nanny: Beewolf grows microbe for protecting young

    For a new twist on child care, consider the wasp called the European beewolf. The mom leaves a smear of bacteria near each of her eggs as protection against the perils of youth.

    This wasp carries an abundance of a particular bacterial species in glands in her antennae, reports Martin Kaltenpoth of the University of Würzburg in Germany. She applies a spot of white goo from these...

    03/09/2005 - 12:24 Other
  • News

    Reflections on Insecticides: Mirror forms of agrochemicals set risk

    Mirror, mirror, on the wall, what's the most hazardous pesticide form of all? Such is the question that scientists and regulators should be asking as they evaluate the environmental effects of pesticides, new research suggests.

    Many molecules, like gloves of a pair, exist in mirror-image forms. A team of environmental researchers has found that for some insecticides, one mirror-image...

    01/05/2005 - 08:53 Earth & Environment