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Your search has returned 34 articles:
  • Feature

    Big Fishing Yields Small Fish

    Sharks, billfish, cod, tuna and other fish-eating fish — the sea’s equivalents to lions on the Serengeti — dominated the marine world as recently as four decades ago. They culled sick, lame and old animals and kept populations of marine herbivores in check, preventing marine analogs of antelopes from overgrazing their environment.

    But the reign of large predators now...

    03/25/2011 - 11:51
  • Feature

    Lettuce Liability

    Little more than a year ago, supermarkets from coast to coast stripped fresh spinach from produce aisles as a food-poisoning outbreak swept the nation. From mid-August through September 2006, virulent bacterial infections sickened at least 204 spinach consumers. Five died and 30 others suffered acute kidney failure.

    Among more than 3,500 genetically unique...

    12/03/2007 - 19:41 Agriculture
  • News

    Crystal matchmaker

    Having evolved from mathematical playthings to curiosities of physics, the structures known as quasicrystals could become great tools for the electronics industry.

    Like crystals, quasicrystals are built from units of atoms arranged in an orderly fashion. But, unlike crystals, quasicrystals have building blocks that interlock in a pattern that doesn't repeat at regular intervals (SN: 10/...

    07/18/2007 - 12:34 Materials
  • Feature

    Dashing Rogues

    In February 1933, the Navy tanker USS Ramapo was steaming its way from the Philippines to San Diego in the midst of an exceptionally strong storm. The 146-meter-long ship was buffeted by near-hurricane–force winds. Early on the morning of Feb. 7, a wave far larger than the others surrounding the ship overtook the Ramapo from behind.

    As the stern of the ship dropped...

    11/13/2006 - 09:18 Earth
  • News

    Alaskan coral beds get new protection

    Huge tracts of delicate coral gardens and soft-coral forests off the coast of Alaska will be permanently protected from fishing gear that targets groundfish and shellfish by scraping the seafloor.

    Most of the affected sites have never been disturbed by this gear. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on June 28 announced its new rule to preserve that...

    07/19/2006 - 10:04 Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Armor-Plated Puzzle

    A few years after Francis H. Crick and James D. Watson unveiled the structure of DNA in 1953, they rocked the fledgling field of molecular biology again with a bold notion: Viruses are, in part, structured as crystals are. That idea captivated Donald L.D. Caspar and Aaron Klug, who then systematically applied what they knew about crystal geometry to classify and predict the structures that...

    08/29/2005 - 10:49 Numbers
  • Feature

    Energy on Ice

    In March 2002, an international team of scientists pumped hot water down a 1,200-meter well located at the edge of the Mackenzie River Delta in northwestern Canada. The water seeped into the pores of the perpetually frozen sediments, melting icelike crystals along its path. These were no ordinary crystals, but frozen cages of water molecules filled with methane, the main constituent of...

    06/21/2005 - 11:02 Chemistry
  • News

    Paint additive hammers coral

    From New Orleans, at a meeting of the Society of Toxicology

    Ocean corals around the world are ill or dead for reasons that remain mysterious. One of the first signs of sickness is bleaching, in which reef-building animals lose the symbiotic algae that give them color and nutrients (SN: 1/30/99, p. 72: http://www.sciencenews.org/pages/sn_arc99/1_30_99/bob1.htm). New laboratory...

    03/22/2005 - 15:54 Earth & Environment
  • Food for Thought

    Carcinogens in the Diet

    It's official. The federal government now has added agents commonly found in overcooked meat to the list of potential cancer causers.

    On Jan. 31, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), part of the National Institutes of Health, published its latest update of materials known to cause cancer in people and others that are "reasonably anticipated" to do so. Among the 246 agents on...

    02/14/2005 - 17:21 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Vitamin Boost

    First in a two-part series. Part II: "Vitamin D: What's Enough?" is available at Vitamin D: What's Enough?.

    The story of vitamin D would appear simple. Take in enough sun or drink enough fortified milk to get the recommended daily amount, and you'll have strong bones. Take a supplement, if you want insurance. But recent studies from around the world have revealed that the...

    10/05/2004 - 11:00 Nutrition